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Sarcastic_Name
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20 Oct 2005, 8:14 pm

When I was little I was dx'd Hypersensitive. All the info I could found was on allergies sensitivity, but what does it mean in the psychological field?


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Sophist
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20 Oct 2005, 8:41 pm

With regards to Autism, there is hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity.

Hypersensitive, for instance with sound, means that there is a greater negative/unpleasant reaction to certain sounds which most people do not experience.

Hyposensitive to sound would mean one is more fond of certain sounds than others and consistantly seeks them out.

It goes the same for the other senses. Hyper = negative reaction to a sensation and thus avoidance; Hypo = positive sensation and thus sensation-seeking.

And just saying one person is either hyper- or hyposensitive is likely inaccurate. It's just "sensitivities" and depending on the sensation, a mix of hyper- and hyposensitivities within a single person (i.e., constantly smelling things, so that they are hyposensitive to certain smells, and avoiding touch so that they are hypersensitive to certain tactile sensations).

Well, this is what I have come to understand.


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Sarcastic_Name
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20 Oct 2005, 9:02 pm

Well, in that case the dx was probably referring to my noise or physical contact sensitivity. I guess I'll never know what it means to have a dx of it. :? Wonder what it's referring to?


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20 Oct 2005, 9:06 pm

Yeah, not sure if it's a diagnosis. "Hypersensitivity" was probably a descriptive forerunner to Sensory Processing Disorder, which still isn't yet in the DSM. I hope one day it will be. But I think the reason that it isn't is that it doesn't usually occur, to my knowledge, without accompanying some other disorder like Autism or ADHD, Tourettes, etc.


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Last edited by Sophist on 20 Oct 2005, 9:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Sarcastic_Name
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20 Oct 2005, 9:08 pm

I have all threee of those things, what does this Sensory Processing Disorder entail?


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20 Oct 2005, 9:11 pm

I've always found this site particularly helpful on Sensory Processing Disorder. Of course, they refer to it by it's slightly older name: Sensory Integration Disorder.

http://www.tourettesyndrome.net/sensory_overview.htm


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Sarcastic_Name
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20 Oct 2005, 10:00 pm

I could easily see how I can get dx'd with something like that if the doctor doesn't understand the real issues I have. I only related to one or two things in that article, and I can explain one with AS and the other with an inner ear imbalance that I haven't asked a doctor about yet. But when I was little I went to a very old and experienced therapist, so Hypersensitivity might have been an even older phrase for SPD. I don't think I have this because most problems my doctor might've attributed to it are actually different kinds of reactions due to my AS, that, and my problems aren't nearly that severe. But as a kid, I was a much different person than I am now. Even so, it was most likely AS and/or ADHD and/or OCD causing the problems I had.

Thanks for the help Sophist! :D


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21 Oct 2005, 4:37 am

What is hypersensitivity? Me! Emotional, that is.


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21 Oct 2005, 7:38 pm

Sarcastic_Name wrote:
I could easily see how I can get dx'd with something like that if the doctor doesn't understand the real issues I have. I only related to one or two things in that article, and I can explain one with AS and the other with an inner ear imbalance that I haven't asked a doctor about yet. But when I was little I went to a very old and experienced therapist, so Hypersensitivity might have been an even older phrase for SPD. I don't think I have this because most problems my doctor might've attributed to it are actually different kinds of reactions due to my AS, that, and my problems aren't nearly that severe. But as a kid, I was a much different person than I am now. Even so, it was most likely AS and/or ADHD and/or OCD causing the problems I had.

Thanks for the help Sophist! :D


Most Aspies have Sensory Processing Disorder. Some have it more severely than others of course. Or some have it more severely with certain senses, and less so with others. It is generally understood as a ::wink, wink:: unlisted criterion for Autism. And of course many other disorders as well.

So, essentially, it's part of your Aspergers. And mine. :)


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21 Oct 2005, 7:44 pm

It is also the reason why many of us stim, too. We are hyposensitive, at times, to stimulation. It is the movement: tactile, vestibular, proprioceptive.

Our sensitivities are not always something so static. They can change given mood or situation. Like when we are under stress, we may become more hyposensitive to certain movements, and thus we stim.

Or we may become hypersensitive in times of stress to sound. So that certain sounds don't bother us when we are calm and comfortable, but are unbearable when we are anxious.

Stimming and sensory sensitivities are all interconnected and due to the same underlying cause.


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21 Oct 2005, 10:18 pm

Sophist wrote:
With regards to Autism, there is hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity.

Hypersensitive, for instance with sound, means that there is a greater negative/unpleasant reaction to certain sounds which most people do not experience.

Hyposensitive to sound would mean one is more fond of certain sounds than others and consistantly seeks them out.


Like the fact that my ears are (somewhat) hypersensitive and I can tell if any electrical appliances are on (like the television from that high-pitched sound it makes), even if no one else can hear it. When I was little, I just thought that everyone could hear these sorts of sounds and I didn't really say anything about it, but I guess people can't. :|


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22 Oct 2005, 12:29 am

Namiko wrote:
Sophist wrote:
With regards to Autism, there is hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity.

Hypersensitive, for instance with sound, means that there is a greater negative/unpleasant reaction to certain sounds which most people do not experience.

Hyposensitive to sound would mean one is more fond of certain sounds than others and consistantly seeks them out.


Like the fact that my ears are (somewhat) hypersensitive and I can tell if any electrical appliances are on (like the television from that high-pitched sound it makes), even if no one else can hear it. When I was little, I just thought that everyone could hear these sorts of sounds and I didn't really say anything about it, but I guess people can't. :|


That is "hypersensitive". But when used in reference to Autism, I think that's just "very good hearing". Hypersensitive would mean that you seek that sound out because it is pleasing to you.

But in non-psych jargon, that is hypersensitive, too.

Hope that hasn't confused anyone anymore.


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22 Oct 2005, 12:37 am

Hm.. I went to an allergist because I am constantly having trouble with my noise/sinuses/throat. He tested every possible allergen on me, and there was no reaction. According to him I am simply "hypersensitive" (which I agree I am, as I notice and am bothered by many smells that most people don't care about). Is this the same thing?



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22 Oct 2005, 1:05 am

Civet wrote:
Hm.. I went to an allergist because I am constantly having trouble with my noise/sinuses/throat. He tested every possible allergen on me, and there was no reaction. According to him I am simply "hypersensitive" (which I agree I am, as I notice and am bothered by many smells that most people don't care about). Is this the same thing?


That is hypersensitive in the psychological sense. Because it involves either a pleasant or unpleasant reaction. But it also seems your sinus track might be irritated by the smells physically. Like myself with cigarette smoke. That's kinda hard to tell. One can find some smell unpleasant, but one doesn't always have a physical reaction to it either. But, at the least, what you describe would involve hypersensitivity in psych terms. And maybe something more.

In the non-Psych use, if you could literally smell things that other people cannot (like Namiko described with hearing and the television), then that would be "hypersensitive", too. But it neither notes a like or dislike. So it's not the psychological use of the term. Kind of a "physical" use instead, if that makes sense. Like almost direct sense versus intepretation.

Sorry, hope that was sort of clear.


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22 Oct 2005, 3:27 pm

I've always been sensitive to certain sounds and textures. Especially textures, I had major therapy getting over my sensitivity to mud and sand. And I just simply don't like many high pitched noises.


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24 Oct 2005, 5:55 am

With me, I also have that T.V/electrical buzzing thing, and things like strobe lighting, or that fluro-light blinking, hard to explain, affect me. Also, sounds, as I put it, 'cut sharp' with me. Sounds affect me big time, paticulary music. When I've 'hit the wall', normal classroom chatter becomes intensified and it goes straight to the brain. It, almost, hurts, do you understand?


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