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acannon
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18 Jul 2008, 5:27 pm

My little guy, who is seven months old, hates when I put clothes on him. He used to be fine with it, but now, he'll just scream and cry even if I put a shirt on him. He'll even do it sometimes when I change his diaper, which he never used to have a problem with at all. I'm not really worried, per se, just curious, and I want to make getting dressed better for him. I have sensory issues, and my husband and I both have Asperger's, so I'm kind of observing him to see if he has it, too. So far, I don't think he does, and he didn't seem to have any sensory issues until this. Is this just a phase or it is sensory-related? In either case, is there anything I can do to help getting dressed better for him?



BeautyWithin
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19 Jul 2008, 12:57 am

Is anything else going on?
Is it really hot where you are?
Any diaper rash, heat rash or anything like that?
Could the clothes be too tight?

You could try different items of clothing (maybe some without seams, different materials) and different diapers to see if it makes your little one more comfortable.



ster
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19 Jul 2008, 6:41 am

*could be*..................on the other hand, my NT son went through a period of time when he didn't want to wear clothes at all. socks were the absolute worst !...as he went through this during the summer, i let him stay as unclothed as he wanted unless we had to go somewhere.many days all he wore was a diaper



carolgatto
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19 Jul 2008, 8:08 am

My youngest, now 3 1/2, had sensory from the day he was born. It started with oral issues, feeding was a nightmare, to touch ( he would only allow plush toys to be near him) and moved on from there. At about the age of 5 months he acted very much like your son. It wasn't so much clothes ( although that bothered him too) we found out as it was being made to stay laying down when getting changed or dressed, it was an issues with feeling ungrounded. We learned to change and dress in record time,lol. We used all cotton and soft clothes and we found that placing a weighted object on his chest helped sometimes. I don't mean something very heavy,lol, just something like one of those stuffed animals filled with beans or whatever. Same theory as like a weighted vest.
On the other hand all babies go through a time period when they don't want to be changed or dressed, but this is usually when they are a little older. Watch for signs of any othe things that might throw the sensory red flags up, eating problems, tactile, tempature changes, hating baths etc... and if you think you are starting to see them take action. You can get a book called Raising A Sensory Smart Child by Lindsey Biel & Nancy Peske, or the Out Of Synch Child by Carol Stock Kranowitz. Good luck and how great a Mom you are to stay vigilant on these issues for your little man.



2ukenkerl
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19 Jul 2008, 10:22 am

YEP, it can be sensory.



acannon
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19 Jul 2008, 7:15 pm

Okay, here are some other things he does:

He really loves baths. He always has, really. He likes warm water but not cold water, though, which isn't really surprising, as I don't know of anyone who really likes cold water.

He loves limes. He'd eat a whole one if we let him. One time, his dad gave him a tiny section of lime and he just ate the whole thing like it was an orange.

He can feed himself with a spoon. The first time I gave him a spoon with some baby food on it, he took it out of my hand and just fed himself. This meant to me that he has very good fine motor skills. He can also pick things up with his thumb and forefinger pretty well.

He also has very good gross motor skills. He taught himself how to roll over at two weeks old, from his tummy to his back. The next week, he rolled from his back to his tummy. He did this multiple times, too, not just once.

And one that happened recently: he fell asleep at a rock concert. We took him with us to see Rush (it was a very nice concert and no one was jumping around or anything, most of the people there were old enough to be my parents, as it is an older band) and he was asleep for half of it. He was fine for the other half, but he did get scared of some parts of it.

He's never really liked blankets. He'll tolerate this one blanket I have, though, but he kicks all of the rest of them off.

He hasn't had any trouble with eating at all, but he doesn't take a bottle and can't seem to figure out sippy cups. He also doesn't really see the point of pacifiers.

He hates being restrained and he is constantly trying to figure out things, and mostly uses things to stand up with.

He doesn't really play with toys, he just chews on them and uses them to complete milestones, and once he does what he's trying to do, he doesn't play with the toy again, really.

Once he sets his mind to doing something (which he just seems to get the idea to do one day), he keeps at it until he does it. It took him about three days to learn how to stand up in his playpen, and he would just keep at it for hours and days until he finally did it.

The reason I don't really suspect that he's autistic is he's very social and uses a lot of facial expressions. He knows about communicating with people and tries to be in our conversations and he responds when people talk to him. He's very charming and he knows that people like him and think he's cute. I just don't know what to make of him, really. I don't know if he has Asperger's, if he's gifted, or what. I mostly don't think about it, because I know it's too early to start putting labels on him, but I want to know what his needs are and attend to them. If he has sensory needs, I want to be able to make things easier for him. I had sensory needs as a child and my parents didn't really seek to make anything easier or try to teach me coping skills and I want to do that for him. I'm not interested in changing or curing him, just finding out his needs and teaching him ways to cope and make his life easier.



EvilTeach
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19 Jul 2008, 9:27 pm

I would recommend a test with cotton fabric.

a tee shirt large enough to cover down to his knees.

also a flannel blanket.

prewash them, and see if he can handle that.