need info with adults over 50 with aspergers...?

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Age1600
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10 Dec 2008, 10:16 pm

No, neither one of my parents have aspergers lol, my whole family is nt as can be except my brother whom has adhd wow that rhymed lol, i'm actually doing this for a friend...



My friend suspects her father is on the spectrum, probably aspergers, and needs as much info as possible...
Can anybody give me some information about adults over 50 like how to get a diagnosis for them? where can they get help? how to identify an adult on the spectrum? best books on relationships on adults with aspergers? how to help an adult on the spectrum? like for instance links to the best sites, or information?


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faithfilly
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10 Dec 2008, 10:45 pm

You're asking big questions for brief answers. Those questions require more questions, like where is your friend's father located? Maybe you might find some links on my blog helpful? A lot depends on how much your friend's father can and wants to do his own research. I don't know where I received the most information because I've looked for it in many directions. An impressive source which helped me understand relationships was from an adult asperger support group (Aspies of the Round Table). I actually learned the most from my neurotypical (adult) daughter after she started learning and comprehending what Aspergers is.


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Age1600
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10 Dec 2008, 10:56 pm

faithfilly wrote:
You're asking big questions for brief answers. Those questions require more questions, like where is your friend's father located? Maybe you might find some links on my blog helpful? A lot depends on how much your friend's father can and wants to do his own research. I don't know where I received the most information because I've looked for it in many directions. An impressive source which helped me understand relationships was from an adult asperger support group (Aspies of the Round Table). I actually learned the most from my neurotypical (adult) daughter after she started learning and comprehending what Aspergers is.


hes not very good with computers, and there located in nj. but thanks i'll take a look at your blog hehe.


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Coadunate
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10 Dec 2008, 11:00 pm

When you find out please let me know as well. I would like VERY MUCH to meet some Aspies over fifty myself. I have never knowingly met any. I am in Southern California.

Ohh, as for “adults over 50 like how to get a diagnosis for them?”. If not on the internet and over fifty years old and they still don’t know they have some form of Aspergers then just leave them be. They are better off not knowing. If they are on the net then just point them to WP and let nature take its course.



faithfilly
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10 Dec 2008, 11:07 pm

Age1600 wrote:
hes not very good with computers, and there located in nj.


New Jersey is good because chances are GRASP might provide opportunities. They have great resources, but he's probably far from Manhattan, right?

Meetup.com has Asperger groups forming in many different locations.


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faithfilly
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10 Dec 2008, 11:13 pm

Coadunate wrote:
I am in Southern California.


Check out GRASP. They have groups in California too.


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faithfilly
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10 Dec 2008, 11:15 pm

I don't know about other Aspies over 50, but as for myself... I LOVE meeting Aspies near age 50 and over! :D I can't describe how wonderful it feels!


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BKBJONES
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11 Dec 2008, 2:22 am

I am over 50, 52 for a few more days. I always knew I was different from many others -- especially since I lived much of my life in very rural areas and had no interest in tractors, pickups or NASCAR. There ARE resources out there. The internet is a great tool, and I would encourage someone to get him wired in with some lessons from a "free" group such as library, YMCA, whatever wherever.

I would encourage them to find out if they are indeed "on the spectrum." I cannot express the warm fuzzies emanating from my dx.



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11 Dec 2008, 3:28 am

same with my family, im the first with aspergers or any kind of autism, my uncle has bipolar though



ablomov
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11 Dec 2008, 3:38 am

Self diagnosis allowed me to handle myself better, know how to handle other people (ie avoid face to face groups like the plague) and generally manage myself better - being less in the dark. For instance 'know' the oddness of ranting to strangers, trying to cope with confusion, racing thoughts, anger with obtuse people, the need to get away from people into wild landscape every three or so days for a few hours etc etc - oh yeah and I'm really having problems at work, having to keep myself hidden away as I feel I may vent without control. Oh dear......



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11 Dec 2008, 1:26 pm

Age,
mum recently wanted to send a book to her sister-who she thinks definitely has some form of autism and she is in her forties or fifties, so the keyworker am have at the national autistic society gave her two ASD book guides and what they are about-one of them is aimed at the NAS staff,the other aimed at children and adults on the spectrum/families etc,if can wait till saturday,am will scan them on with dads pc/scanner,
so can have a read through the books available.


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gary
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11 Dec 2008, 1:44 pm

Older people who have AS as opposed to more 'traditional' types of autism can appear to become more 'normal' over time since they're fast learners about adaptation and many never suspect they may have the condition so 'spotting' older people on the spectrum is pretty hard to do just by observing characteristics. From what I've read the idea that autism is 'passed down' is not gaining a lot of support out there in the scientific community. At least not passed down directly from parent to child but perhaps skipping several generations if it has a genetic basis. That's all I can contribute.



Age1600
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11 Dec 2008, 10:44 pm

KingdomOfRats wrote:
Age,
mum recently wanted to send a book to her sister-who she thinks definitely has some form of autism and she is in her forties or fifties, so the keyworker am have at the national autistic society gave her two ASD book guides and what they are about-one of them is aimed at the NAS staff,the other aimed at children and adults on the spectrum/families etc,if can wait till saturday,am will scan them on with dads pc/scanner,
so can have a read through the books available.


thanks, i need as much information as i can get hehe


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faithfilly
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12 Dec 2008, 8:49 am

gary wrote:
Older people who have AS as opposed to more 'traditional' types of autism can appear to become more 'normal' over time since they're fast learners about adaptation and many never suspect they may have the condition so 'spotting' older people on the spectrum is pretty hard to do just by observing characteristics. From what I've read the idea that autism is 'passed down' is not gaining a lot of support out there in the scientific community. At least not passed down directly from parent to child but perhaps skipping several generations if it has a genetic basis. That's all I can contribute.


That's all?... that's plenty! Even though it doesn't look like a lot, you've said much and you've said it well.


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KingdomOfRats
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14 Dec 2008, 10:21 am

Age,
sorry for the usual delay...have scanned most of the booklet thing on,left out the pages which were useless to an adult [the little children sections] and left out the video/dvd/cd sections as well as they were all uk based only.
the rest of these books should be able to be bought in the us as theyve got isdn on them-think that means if go and show it to a book shop staff,they will be able to find it or order it in.
there arent a lot of adult books available but have scanned almost all ages and sections in case he would find any of them relatable and helpful.
if cant see the text on the pages,save them and zoom in,and if they arent loading,its because image shack is being crap again,refreshing should do it,or try later-couldnt think of another image host.

front page
http://img227.imageshack.us/img227/4456 ... agent4.jpg


recommended reading
http://img218.imageshack.us/img218/5772/apagerb7.jpg

http://img73.imageshack.us/img73/4217/bpagecb2.jpg


the NAS autism helpline books
http://img227.imageshack.us/img227/7031/cpagebb7.jpg

http://img227.imageshack.us/img227/9739/dpagepy8.jpg


general books on autism and asperger syndrome
http://img235.imageshack.us/img235/6912/epagejx7.jpg


children with autism and asperger syndrome
http://img218.imageshack.us/img218/5200/ffpagehl8.jpg


children with autism and asperger syndrome continued,and explaining autism spectrum disorders to children
http://img218.imageshack.us/img218/2389/gpagezx0.jpg


explaining autism spectrum disorders to children continued,and adolescence with autism and aspergers syndrome
http://img91.imageshack.us/img91/7595/hpagerg8.jpg


adolescence with autism and aspergers syndrome continued,and adults with autism and asperger syndrome
http://img227.imageshack.us/img227/2258/ipagetp5.jpg


behavior
http://img78.imageshack.us/img78/6128/jpagemr3.jpg


sensory issues. diet and the autistic spectrum
http://img229.imageshack.us/img229/7751/kpagemw9.jpg


communication. education
http://img229.imageshack.us/img229/2302/lpagefh4.jpg


partners. sexuality
http://img229.imageshack.us/img229/7356/mpagewz9.jpg


sexuality continued, and employment
http://img228.imageshack.us/img228/1343/npageyr3.jpg


personal accounts. novels
http://img218.imageshack.us/img218/8765/opagebx7.jpg



what could also do is print off some pages written by adults on the internet,so then he does not have to use a computer.


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>severely autistic.
>>the residential autist; http://theresidentialautist.blogspot.co.uk
blogging from the view of an ex institutionalised autism/ID activist now in community care.
>>>help to keep bullying off our community,report it!