Finding a place to be themselves

Page 1 of 1 [ 9 posts ] 

Brandosmom
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

User avatar

Joined: 20 Jan 2009
Gender: Female
Posts: 2

21 Jan 2009, 8:52 pm

My son is 14 and has Aspergers. He feels very isolated. Everything I find in my area for kids on the spectrum has to do with trying to make him “typical”. Sure he has to function in the world, and maybe the services can help with that, but no services can change who he is, and none of these services help him learn to be OK with who he is, and always will be. That is what I want for him. He needs a space where he can be him, and that is ok, so he can learn to be ok with who he is.
We have clubs for racial minorities, religious groups, as well as gay and lesbian kids, but nothing for spectrum kids. Places where they can be them, around others who are like them. I want to create a space like that. I want to create a space for Aspergers, or very high functioning Autistic kids to come, and be able to be themselves, interacting with others like them in the ways they choose.
I am now in the process of looking for model programs. I want to research other providers who have created things like this for Spectrum kids.
Does anyone here know of any programs or groups who have tried doing anything like this? Do you know of any adult Asperger’s groups that I might be able to contact to gather ideas from? I would appreciate any leads you might be able to give me.
Becky



gramirez
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 9 Nov 2008
Age: 26
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,880
Location: Barrington, Illinois

21 Jan 2009, 9:07 pm

Does he go to a public school? More often than not, there may be a group therapy(not really the right word) session for those with similar issues, typically hosted by the social services/special education team. You may want to check it out and see if there is something like that available.


_________________
Reality is a nice place but I wouldn't want to live there


CelticGoddess
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Feb 2006
Age: 45
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,968

21 Jan 2009, 9:32 pm

I don't know where you live, but I would highly reccommend the Geneva Centre for Autism in Toronto. They are outstanding and they have social groups for kids on the spectrum. I would think that they would be a good resource to talk to. My experience with them has been nothing but extremely positive. www.autism.net



ster
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Sep 2005
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,727
Location: new england

22 Jan 2009, 8:20 am

check out GRASP......and ASRC..........they have had successful youth and adult programs...........



koadah
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

User avatar

Joined: 12 Jan 2008
Age: 55
Gender: Male
Posts: 28
Location: London, UK

22 Jan 2009, 10:30 am

Sounds as though you need something like this http://www.autism.org.uk.

Become a member an you get notified of events, clubs, outings etc.
My son has been on some terrific programmes that we would not have heard about otherwise.
The whole family has been on some good outings too.

I assume that the closer you are to a big city the more will be going on near you.

Sometimes a parent has to find similar parents to start a group.



DW_a_mom
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 22 Feb 2008
Age: 61
Gender: Female
Posts: 11,233
Location: Northern California

22 Jan 2009, 3:17 pm

I think it's a terrific idea, to set up a gathering place catering to spectrum kids. Maybe with live Dungeons and Dragons to play? And lots of sensory stuff - soft walls, sensory toys, etc. I was going to suggest lots of computers, but maybe that goes a bit against your goals. I wish I had a model or ideas, but I don't. Just encouragement. Go for it!


_________________
Mom to an amazing AS son, who recently graduated from the university (plus an also amazing non-AS daughter). Most likely part of the "Broader Autism Phenotype" (some traits).


Anonymom
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

User avatar

Joined: 30 Dec 2008
Gender: Female
Posts: 4

22 Jan 2009, 8:05 pm

I was looking for something similar for my son. I kept thinking, "He needs a supervised boy's club". Luckily, I did find a once-a-week group called "Social Funjoyment" that's been great for my son. It is much less like other social s :) :) kills classes he has been in and is really like managed fun.



ike
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 9 Aug 2007
Age: 45
Gender: Male
Posts: 693
Location: Boston, MA

23 Jan 2009, 12:24 am

DW_a_mom wrote:
I think it's a terrific idea, to set up a gathering place catering to spectrum kids. Maybe with live Dungeons and Dragons to play? And lots of sensory stuff - soft walls, sensory toys, etc. I was going to suggest lots of computers, but maybe that goes a bit against your goals. I wish I had a model or ideas, but I don't. Just encouragement. Go for it!


I really miss playing pencil-and-paper roleplaying games... When I was in middle school and high-school this is basically the only way I got any socialization... and as I've grown up and gotten out of the house (out of necessity -- you wouldn't want to live with my family either, even if you could), I've unfortunately been unable to insinuate myself into a gaming group for any length of time.


_________________
Are you a HooLiGaN?
http://www.woohooligan.com/archive.php?a=wp


mysterious_misfit
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Age: 38
Gender: Female
Posts: 523

23 Jan 2009, 12:03 pm

I grew up at a time before Asperger's was even an available diagnosis. I found plenty of space to be myself. I had numerous interests and hobbies, some that I read about or did by myself, and some that I shared with others.

I don't know how your son feels about himself or his Asperger's, but since I was unaware that there was anything 'wrong' with me, I never felt bad about persuing my own interests. Maybe he could just find some others that share his hobbies, formally, or informally.