If God has always existed and created the world.

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Sand
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28 Nov 2010, 7:03 pm

ChrisVulcan wrote:
Sand wrote:
phil777 wrote:
He was being bored. Most likely. ^.-


Since God is omniscient and knows everything that could, would and did happen, how could he ever escape boredom?


Boredom is like hunger. Hunger is a signal that you need food. Boredom is a signal that you need something to do. God doesn't have any needs, so he is never bored.


I wonder what kind of thing you visualize as dynamic and without needs. It seems to violate all conceptions of God.



Philologos
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28 Nov 2010, 9:12 pm

Excuse me? Can you please document me a Christian conception of God as having needs?

Yes, the gods of the various IndoEuropean traditions - Vedic through Slavic through Greek through Roman to Celtic and Teutonic [best known from the Scandinavian] were equipped with needs an hormones. Less familiar with Egyptian, Babylonian and the various Central American, almost purely blank on Asian, but at least some Polynesian fit the pattern.

But - I have not hit a Christian theology that sees God as needy. Having desires yes.

So who claims that?



Sand
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29 Nov 2010, 1:19 am

Philologos wrote:
Excuse me? Can you please document me a Christian conception of God as having needs?

Yes, the gods of the various IndoEuropean traditions - Vedic through Slavic through Greek through Roman to Celtic and Teutonic [best known from the Scandinavian] were equipped with needs an hormones. Less familiar with Egyptian, Babylonian and the various Central American, almost purely blank on Asian, but at least some Polynesian fit the pattern.

But - I have not hit a Christian theology that sees God as needy. Having desires yes.

So who claims that?


Perhaps I am being presumptive but how do you distinguish needs from declared desires?



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29 Nov 2010, 9:52 am

Now there is a genuine and not uninteresting question.

Of course, you have a point. Just as my brother, faced by his chosen field to take a stance on what types of organism are living and which not, essentially pick a point on the continuum, plunks downn his finger, and says HERE is where RED ends [and I thank my God that the majority of linguists refuse to do the same for "when do two speech forms constitute separate languages"], so you nan make a case for a continuum of drives. When will one starve if he does not ingest certain substances, and when is it just I feel like pizza?

And for me [for you too, I suppose] it is difficult to resolve. Do I NEED low stress down time? I certainly function better internally and externally if I get it. How much faster do I have to die if deprived for it to constitute a need?

We have seen [look for one example at the Blight voyage from the Bounty] that humans can go through protracted periods of extreme deprivation of food, water, rest, shelter and everyone in the boat survive.

But since the subject of this thought experiment [which it must be for both of us, since neither of us claims direct knowledge] is the mainstream Christian deity,

And since a prime descriptor of this deity is Causing but Uncaused -

If there are no precursors for God, no necessary conditions for his existence, then it follows that no divine Drives can be Needs.

So that the distinction in neediness between Asgard and Olympus on the one hand and Christian Eternity on the other is a secondary function of the claimed uncaused eternity of the latter and the stated origins and end of the former.

Thank you - I think that is a fruitful insight.

See how easy and fulfilling it can be?