"Aucorigia", "aucory" - my look at ASD and "similars"

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QFT
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26 May 2020, 1:48 am

nca14 wrote:
"Origia" is shortening from "original" and the part of the word "original", in which the letter "n" is present, is omitted because it is quite near the end of the word, so the core of the part "origia" is "orig-" and "-ia" is a suffix. First part of the word "aucorigia" is from two first letters of words "auto" and "contrast", and "o" is also first letter of the word "originality".


I see you are from Poland. Could this be a language issue? Is it common with Polish words to skip letters when they are modified?

I am from Russia. In Russian they don't skip letters but, instead, they add various endings. I would assume Polish is similar to Russian since they are both Slavic languages; but I don't really know, I never studied Polish.

nca14 wrote:
For me many cases of NVLD and cases of SCD are cases of the same condition as milder ASD. Schizo disorders (like schizophrenia, schizoaffective, schizotypal, schizoid) "probably" are also aucorigic when starting in childhood, before adolescence.


As far as including schizoid and schizotypal, that makes sense. But as far as including schizophrenia -- thats a bit surprising. I mean with autism you included high functioning autism and didn't include low functioning. So with schizophrenia spectrum maybe you should do the same: include high functioniong cases (which would be schizoid and schizotypal) and don't include low functioning (which would be schizophrenia and schizoaffective).

So why did you decide to include schizophrenia and schizoaffective if you aren't including low functioning autism?



nca14
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31 May 2020, 8:48 am

I think that rules of word formation in Polish are similar to those in Russian. Letters which are in further part of the word may be more likely skipped (omitted) when new words from parts of other words are formed.

Individuals with schizophrenia and schizoaffective are usually without intellectual disability and tend to have little or no functional language impairment, especially in remission. Most of them are like individuals with high-functioning ASD, not like those with typical low-functioning ASD (which is quite often associated with very low IQ and severe problems with functional language). Average individual with schizophrenia is, in my opinion, less disabled than average person with low-functioning autism.

I had diagnosis of schizophrenia (paranoid or unspecified) for some time in 2016, but later they changed it for Asperger's, schizotypal and OCD (which I had before 2016). I think that someone with Asperger's may function worse than someone with schizophrenia (especially if individual with schizophrenia gets medications and does not have severe psychotic symptoms, such as those which require staying in mental hospital). Schizotypal disorder appears to have less "violent" presentation than schizophrenia or even schizoaffective and bipolar, but I think that schizotypal disorder can be also pretty disabling despite that. In ICD-10 used in Poland there is no position called "schizotypal personality disorder", but there is "schizotypal disorder", "schizophrenia-type disorder" which is classified not with personality disorders, but in one subpart of F chapter of ICD (in which there are mental disorders) with schizophrenia, persistent delusional disorder and schizoaffective disorder. I was diagnosed with "schizophrenia-type disorder" from ICD-10, not with "schizotypal personality disorder" from DSM. I suppose that "schizophrenia-type disorder" may be a sort of "psychotic disorder", it may looks like "psychosis with better insight". I may have "very schizophrenia-like" thoughts, but I do not believe in them, so maybe I was diagnosed with "schizotypal disorder", not full-blown psychosis.



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31 May 2020, 10:39 am

nca14 wrote:
I think that someone with Asperger's may function worse than someone with schizophrenia (especially if individual with schizophrenia gets medications and does not have severe psychotic symptoms, such as those which require staying in mental hospital).


But if you think schizophrenia is just about "original way of thinking", why should they be required meds or staying in the hospital?



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31 May 2020, 3:31 pm

I recognise some cases of schizophrenia as cases of aucorigia because schizophrenia also can make a person socially inadequate and inept, also the individual with schizophrenia might be described as having "peculiarities" in content of thoughts and someone who presents "bizarrity". Individuals with ASD are also socially inadequate and inept and their symptoms might be considered "bizarre" or "peculiar". I think that individual with childhood-onset schizophrenia rather would have aucorigia (for example when meds do not make that person completely "normal"), but someone who has schizophrenic symptoms since adolescence or adulthood rather would not have (developmental) aucorigia.

Aucorigia may be high-functioning and can not require support or (in Poland) ruling of disability or disability pension. But it can be lower-functioning and can require less or more support.

Aucorigia is rather not just about original way of thinking. It is a (developmental) disorder which is rather pervasive. It has some deficits, for example in nonverbal communication and often also is associated with clumsiness. Individuals with it are often considered "weird", "odd" by some people.



nikarose
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31 May 2020, 7:32 pm

Autistic people are not socially inept or peculiar. Please google the double empathy hypothesis. It's a difference in development, not inept.



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01 Jun 2020, 3:05 pm

Even if they are not socially inept or peculiar, they still may be easily labelled as "odd" by quite many NT people. Social responses of individuals with ASD may be often considered "inadequate" and their way of thinking may be often "original" (which has not to have negative connotations).

I was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome but I don't think that I do not have intuitive theory of mind. Even before going to elementary school I knew that other persons do not think the same as I (for example, that they have other interests that I). My imaginative play might be (quite) normal and I suppose that I did not have larger problems with it (especially when I played with my family members). I think that in USA or Canada I would have been diagnosed with NVLD. But I was "odd", "bizarre", "abnormal" also. For example, I have peculiar sexuality since childhood and I do not want to have it. I like maps, graphs, had sometimes very good results in mathematics. Or maybe I have a personality disorder instead of NVLD (or with it)? I think that I do not fit to stereotypical image of an individual with ASD.



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17 Mar 2021, 3:59 pm

I tend to think Autism Spectrum Disorder, Social (Pragmatic) Communication Disorder,
Stereotypic Movement Disorder, Unspecified Communication Disorder, Intellectual Disabilities or any Communication Disorders as Pervasive Developmental Disorders.

I don't think there are difference just because one symptom of restricted interests or repetitive behavior is not a symptom for Social Communication Disorder and Unspecified Communication Disorder. I think there should be one name for all Communication Disorders, ASD and Intellectual Debilitates.

I tend think that there are none-autistic Pervasive Developmental Disorders, even though ASD is a form of Pervasive Developmental Disorder. Because there are developmental disorders that are not Autism, but have symptoms related to Autism.



Social (pragmatic) communication disorder:

A. Persistent difficulties in the social use of verbal and nonverbal communication as manifested by all of the following:
1. Deficits in using communication for social purposes, such as greeting and sharing information, in a manner that is appropriate for the social context.
2. Impairment of the ability to change communication to match context or the needs of the listener, such as speaking differently in a classroom than on a playground, talking differently to a child than to an adult, and avoiding use of overly formal language.
3. Difficulties following rules for conversation and storytelling, such as taking turns in conversation, rephrasing when misunderstood, and knowing how to use verbal and nonverbal signals to regulate interaction.
4. Difficulties understanding what is not explicitly stated (e.g., making inferences) and nonliteral or ambiguous language (e.g., idioms, humor, metaphors, multiple meanings that depend on the context for interpretation).

B. The deficits result in functional limitations in effective communication, social participation, social relationships, academic achievement, or occupational performance, individually or in combination.
C. The onset of symptoms is in the early developmental period (but deficits may not become fully manifest until social communication demands exceed limited capacities).



Diagnostic Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder:


1) Persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across multiple contexts, as manifested by the following, currently or by history (examples are illustrative, not exhaustive; see text):
Deficits in social-emotional reciprocity, ranging, for example, from abnormal social approach and failure of normal back-and-forth conversation; to reduced sharing of interests, emotions, or affect; to failure to initiate or respond to social interactions.

2) Deficits in nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction, ranging, for example, from poorly integrated verbal and nonverbal communication; to abnormalities in eye contact and body language or deficits in understanding and use of gestures; to a total lack of facial expressions and nonverbal communication.
Deficits in developing, maintaining, and understand relationships, ranging, for example, from difficulties adjusting behavior to suit various social contexts; to difficulties in sharing imaginative play or in making friends; to absence of interest in peers.

Specify current severity:

1) Severity is based on social communication impairments and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior.

2) Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities, as manifested by at least two of the following, currently or by history (examples are illustrative, not exhaustive; see text):
Stereotyped or repetitive motor movements, use of objects, or speech (e.g., simple motor stereotypes, lining up toys or flipping objects, echolalia, idiosyncratic phrases).

3) Insistence on sameness, inflexible adherence to routines, or ritualized patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior (e.g., extreme distress at small changes, difficulties with transitions, rigid thinking patterns, greeting rituals, need to take same route or eat same food every day).

4) Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus (e.g., strong attachment to or preoccupation with unusual objects, excessively circumscribed or perseverative interests).
Hyper- or hyporeactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of the environment (e.g. apparent indifference to pain/temperature, adverse response to specific sounds or textures, excessive smelling or touching of objects, visual fascination with lights or movement).
Specify current severity:

Severity is based on social communication impairments and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior.

Symptoms must be present in the early developmental period (but may not become fully manifest until social demands exceed limited capacities, or may be masked by learned strategies in later life).

Symptoms cause clinically significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of current functioning.




DSM-5 defines intellectual disabilities as neurodevelopmental disorders that begin in childhood and are characterized by intellectual difficulties as well as difficulties in conceptual, social, and practical areas of living. The DSM-5 diagnosis of ID requires the satisfaction of three criteria:

1.
Deficits in intellectual functioning—“reasoning, problem solving, planning, abstract thinking, judgment, academic learning, and learning from experience”—confirmed by clinical evaluation and individualized standard IQ testing (APA, 2013, p. 33);

2.
Deficits in adaptive functioning that significantly hamper conforming to developmental and sociocultural standards for the individual's independence and ability to meet their social responsibility; and

3.
The onset of these deficits during childhood.


Stereotypic Movement Disorder:

Stereotypic movement disorder is a condition in which a person makes repetitive, purposeless movements



Not all Communication Disorders are Intellectual Disabilities, Communication Disorders can be depending on the severity.



FranzOren
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25 Apr 2021, 5:23 pm

I consider communication disorders and Autism Spectrum Disorder to be Developmental Communication Angosia.

I call it Developmental Communication Angosia Spectrum Disorder.



Technic1
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26 Apr 2021, 4:48 am

Separate disorders.

Next there will be a phobia of tying your left shoelace first.

Imagine what a Neanderthal could be diagnosed with.



FranzOren
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26 Apr 2021, 8:16 am

Grouping communication disorders and Autism Spectrum Disorders together.

I consider communication disorders and Autism Spectrum Disorder to be Developmental Communication Angosia.

I call it Developmental Communication Angosia Spectrum Disorder.

I made a new diagnostic disorder for communication disorders and ASD for ICD-11 and DSM-5.

I am not a medical professional of any kind. I just have an autistic interests in forensics, psychology, neurology, psychiatry, neuropsychiatry, neuroopthalmology, criminology and criminal statistics and victimology and neuropsychology.


This new disorder includes symptoms of ASD and other communication delays as well.


You should not have to have restricted interests and repetitive behaviors to have PDD.

I changed the meaning of it now.

But restricted interests and repetitive behaviors is a core symptom of PDD.


Source:

https://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/all ... ation-page



Best regards,

Oren Franz



FranzOren
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26 Apr 2021, 1:57 pm

nca14 wrote:
Saying that someone has aucory is somewhat like saying that something is a flying animal or a swimming animal. There are different flying animals: birds, mammals (bats), insects (invertebrates). Swimming animals can be fish or mammals (such as whales). Aucory is not homogenous.

I think that current diagnostic criteria are not good. Someone can make ICD-10 or DSM-V criteria for Asperger's or pervasive developmental disorder but may do not make DSM-V criteria of autism spectrum disorder. Aucorigia is NOT necessarily something which make DSM-V criteria. I think that people with NVLD should have similar life helps that have people with clinical ASD.

And NVLD is for me a neurodevelopmental disorder from the same subgroup of neurodevelopmental disorders as ASD. And I would place NVLD in another group of developmental disorders than dyslexia or dyscalculia. NVLD is for me "closer" to ADHD than to dyslexia or pure dyscalculia.

I would not classify so-called nonverbal learning disorder (NLD, NVLD) and social communication disorder (SCD) as "specific developmental disorder", but as aucoric disorders in one subgroup of developmental disorders with full-blown autism spectrum disorder. I think that aucory is good, useful concept.

Diagnosis of SCD may often does not ecompass all symptoms which an individual has. People with SCD may have sensory processing disorders or ADHD, learning difficulties or speech delay. They may have one of four features of ASD associated with repetitive and restricted behaviors.

Symptoms of aucory may be divided into five subgroups:
- social-communicational (dyssemia - impairment of nonverbal communication, problems with social reciprocity (such as one-sided conversations), social ineptitude and failures in social contacts, lack of friends, problems with pragmatic use of language or delayed development of speech),
- emotional and thought content (atypical, obsessive, narrow interests, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, routines and rituals, magical or bizarre thinking, atypical emotional reactions (such as paragelia - inappropiate, uncontrolled laughter)),
- executive functioning (EF) and movemental (EF disorders, attention deficits, sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT); hyperactivity, hyperkinetic behavior, restlessness, stims, tics),
- somatic (poor strength and endurance, perinatal issues such as hypotrophy or pre-term birth, sensory processing disorders and sensory idiosyncracies or problems with dealing with unpleasant sensory stimuli)
- cognitive and motoric (dysharmonic IQ profile, dyslexia, dyscalculia; clumsiness (to a different degree)).




Is it okay if I copy your diagnostic criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorders and Learning Disorders? I made a new diagnostic criteria for communication disorders and ASD.


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