Do I strike you as a Level 1 or a Level 2?

Page 1 of 3 [ 36 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

CockneyRebel
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Jul 2004
Age: 49
Gender: Male
Posts: 113,754
Location: Stalag 13

22 Jan 2024, 12:09 pm

I'm trying to find out exactly where I am on the spectrum.

On one hand, I've been living on my own for nearly 18 years. I can handle my own money and pay my own bills. I'm also able to do my own grocery shopping with a ride from a friend. I've held down 4 jobs. One that was seasonal, one that was full-time and two that were part-time.

On the other hand, I seem to be attached to anything that looks like a German helmet, my place can be a mess sometimes and I have tearful meltdowns instead of violent ones. I need to wear pull-ups day and night because I can't always get to the bathroom on time and I have no control at night.

Would I be a Level 1, or a Level 2.


_________________
Who wants to adopt a Sweet Pea?


blitzkrieg
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jun 2011
Age: 35
Gender: Male
Posts: 16,787
Location: United Kingdom

22 Jan 2024, 12:16 pm

Incontinence seems like a rather significant impairment.

I'd go for level 2.



TheOutsider
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

Joined: 26 Jan 2022
Gender: Male
Posts: 79

22 Jan 2024, 12:24 pm

The DSM-5 levels seem to indicate support needs. I'm not a professional in this field, and even a psychologist cannot diagnose you online, but since the support needs you describe are minimal, it seems like you would be Level 1.



DanielW
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Jan 2019
Age: 35
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,873
Location: PNW USA

22 Jan 2024, 12:33 pm

ASD levels are primarily based on the amount of an inconvenience you are to neurotypical people so I decree that you are a level 0, my friend :D

The levels are meaningless, designed by people who don't truly understand autism. A person's need for support will often vary day to day and will also depend on circumstances.



IsabellaLinton
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Nov 2017
Gender: Female
Posts: 71,030
Location: Chez Quis

22 Jan 2024, 1:08 pm

Incontinence isn't part of autism.
The support levels are only based on our autism-related needs.
For example, I've had a strokes but they don't factor in my stroke needs.

I can't answer, CR, because I don't know you well enough.
How much are you bothered by sensory concerns?
That's one way they measure our support levels.

Otherwise I agree with Daniel. :heart:


_________________
And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make.


blitzkrieg
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jun 2011
Age: 35
Gender: Male
Posts: 16,787
Location: United Kingdom

22 Jan 2024, 1:14 pm

IsabellaLinton wrote:
Incontinence isn't part of autism.
The support levels are only based on our autism-related needs.
For example, I've had a strokes but they don't factor in my stroke needs.

I can't answer, CR, because I don't know you well enough.
How much are you bothered by sensory concerns?
That's one way they measure our support levels.

Otherwise I agree with Daniel. :heart:


Does it not depend on the type of incontinence, as to whether it might be autism related?

For example, ADHD doesn't necessitate bedwetting, but there are medications out there (tricyclic antidepressants) that can be used to treat bedwetting in ADHD patients.

Might issues with executive function/self regulation not conceivably cause incontinence of some variety?



IsabellaLinton
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Nov 2017
Gender: Female
Posts: 71,030
Location: Chez Quis

22 Jan 2024, 1:25 pm

I don't know. Maybe. CR would need to ask his doctor about the cause.

I've had both kinds of urinary incontinence (stress and urge) as well as bowel, because of my injuries.
I guess that wouldn't be considered an ASD functioning thing.
Mine was fixed with more surgeries, and physiotherapy.

CR, have you had this issue since childhood?
Do you know the cause?


_________________
And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make.


DanielW
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Jan 2019
Age: 35
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,873
Location: PNW USA

22 Jan 2024, 1:32 pm

Incontinence issues related to ASD and and ADHD can stem from poor interoception. Especially when combined with executive function issues - "been there, done that...got the t-shirt".



Edna3362
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 29 Oct 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 12,001
Location: ᜆᜄᜎᜓᜄ᜔

22 Jan 2024, 2:38 pm

Why is there not a level between level 1 and 2?
Or in some cases, between level 0 and 1?


_________________
Gained Number Post Count (1).
Lose Time (n).

Lose more time here - Updates at least once a week.


blitzkrieg
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jun 2011
Age: 35
Gender: Male
Posts: 16,787
Location: United Kingdom

22 Jan 2024, 2:43 pm

DanielW wrote:
Incontinence issues related to ASD and and ADHD can stem from poor interoception. Especially when combined with executive function issues - "been there, done that...got the t-shirt".


Right?

In the same way that an autistic person might not know if they are thirsty or hungry (this can happen to some autistic folk), surely some, not all, autistic folk, might have difficulty with telling whether they need to pee or poop - and at what time?



ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 66
Gender: Male
Posts: 34,724
Location: Long Island, New York

22 Jan 2024, 2:49 pm

Without knowing what you are like when you are not on wrong planet it is hard to say but if I would hazard a guess I would say Level 2.

If you really need to know get a reassessment not only for Autism but for commorbids. Personally since you are very accepting of your Autistic self I do not see the need for a reassessment but I am not you.


_________________
Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity

“My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person”. - Sara Luterman


ToughDiamond
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Sep 2008
Age: 71
Gender: Male
Posts: 11,711

22 Jan 2024, 2:51 pm

My humble opinion: I doubt a competent health professional would factor incontinence into an assessment of ASD level. There's a case for it being related to ASD, but its diagnostic power for ASD must be very weak. Loads of people have incontinence but no ASD and loads of people have ASD but no incontinence. It may be a common comorbid in children but I've not seen anything suggesting it to be a common comorbid in adults. If it's of little use for diagnosing whether an adult has ASD or not, I don't see how it could be any use for estimating the level. Basically it's a stretch to blame ASD for it in the light of the evidence we have so far about CR's case. But more evidence might overturn that.



Last edited by ToughDiamond on 22 Jan 2024, 2:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.

CockneyRebel
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Jul 2004
Age: 49
Gender: Male
Posts: 113,754
Location: Stalag 13

22 Jan 2024, 2:52 pm

Thank you for all of your answers so far.


_________________
Who wants to adopt a Sweet Pea?


CockneyRebel
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Jul 2004
Age: 49
Gender: Male
Posts: 113,754
Location: Stalag 13

22 Jan 2024, 3:00 pm

IsabellaLinton wrote:
I don't know. Maybe. CR would need to ask his doctor about the cause.

I've had both kinds of urinary incontinence (stress and urge) as well as bowel, because of my injuries.
I guess that wouldn't be considered an ASD functioning thing.
Mine was fixed with more surgeries, and physiotherapy.

CR, have you had this issue since childhood?
Do you know the cause?


Through my younger years between the ages 6 and 31, I'd strain to make myself have a BM before going somewhere or going to bed out of fear of having an accident to the point of getting the results that I wanted.

The issue started when I was 32 years old.

I'd always have unpleasant memories of my parents losing their tempers at me depending on who was around the times that I did have a BM accident between the ages 4 and 6, every time I sat down on the toilet to spend a penny. Those flashbacks were a great motivator.


_________________
Who wants to adopt a Sweet Pea?


old_comedywriter
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Jan 2006
Gender: Male
Posts: 687
Location: Somewhere west of where you are

22 Jan 2024, 3:39 pm

I know the meaning of life, at least for me.

Does that make me a level 42?


_________________
It ain't easy being me, but someone's gotta do it.


DirkGently69
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Nov 2021
Gender: Male
Posts: 899
Location: Australia

22 Jan 2024, 3:55 pm

old_comedywriter wrote:
I know the meaning of life, at least for me.

Does that make me a level 42?

That a very…Deep Thought :D

In regards to the OP, I was diagnosed last year as level 2. If you ask me I think I am only level 1, but the psychologist determined level 2 because of my associated mental health issues, ambivalence about people, and various other factors. I know a few people on here who are level 2, and I feel like that have more issues than I do, so I think a lot of it comes down to the country you are in, the efficacy of the diagnostic process and even the reasoning behind getting a diagnosis.