Do you think Asperger's is something to be proud of?

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Yupa
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09 Jun 2010, 3:09 pm

From my observation it isn't.

It looks like there are a lot of people on this forum who wave it around like a badge of pride. Not a good thing. You tell people out in the real world you have Asperger's, they see that as a disability and a bad thing. People are naturally uncomfortable around those they perceive as sick. If you tell someone you have Asperger's, they will think of you as mentally sick and try to avoid you.

It will also probably be extremely hard to land a job or make friends if you tell people publicly that you have a mental disorder.

If anything you should hide it and try to act normal. Believe it or not, it's not that hard.



Lene
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09 Jun 2010, 3:15 pm

No.

It's just a medical condition. It annoys me when people act like it's a lifestyle choice or something.



Michael_Stuart
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09 Jun 2010, 3:26 pm

Well, I don't believe in taking pride in things you didn't accomplish. As it takes no special effort to get Asperger's or an other ASD, I don't think you can really be proud of it. Of course, you can be proud of yourself for coping with problems that arise, or for achieving your full potential, but of having the condition itself I just I don't see it.

However, I don't believe in hiding who you are because of society's pressures. We've had that experiment run quite a few times in the 20th century, and it never worked. That's not to say I think it's wise or necessary to tell every person you meet all about Asperger's Syndrome. After all, telling them doesn't change who you are, and if they were going to accept you they'd do so even if you didn't tell them. It seems a bit of an attention-grab, though I'm not accusing.

You can be happy to have Asperger's Syndrome, but proud? Nah.



redwulf25_ci
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09 Jun 2010, 3:58 pm

Pride in your AS makes as much sense as pride in having blue eyes, being right handed, or being American.

No sense at all in other words.



Ferdinand
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09 Jun 2010, 4:00 pm

Having Aspergers is only the foundation of a house built with greatness.


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psychointegrator
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09 Jun 2010, 4:08 pm

Your question doesn't make sense to me.



cyberscan
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09 Jun 2010, 4:10 pm

Having a certain neurological configuration is not something to be proud of. It is what we do with our condition that should make us proud or ashamed. However, again, it may be something to be proud of. We have Black pride, White pride, Irish pride, etc.


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Dots
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09 Jun 2010, 4:19 pm

I've not been diagnosed with Asperger's but I do deal with Bipolar Disorder and I'm not proud to have that, though there are people out there who like some Aspies have "Bipolar Pride".

What I am proud of is how much I've overcome while dealing with it. I'm not proud to be Bipolar but I'm proud of the coping skills I've developed.

edit: Yeah, pretty much what cyberscan said.


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Last edited by Dots on 09 Jun 2010, 4:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Ambivalence
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09 Jun 2010, 4:19 pm

Yupa wrote:
Do you think Asperger's is something to be proud of?


No.

Quote:
If you tell someone you have Asperger's, they will think of you as mentally sick and try to avoid you.


Not IME. I've had good support and understanding.

Quote:
If anything you should hide it and try to act normal. Believe it or not, it's not that hard.


You are wrong. You may yourself be able to act normal, and if you feel you should it's up to you, but you imply that that choice is open to all. It is not. It's pretty much not by definition, as an autism diagnosis requires impairment in interaction and communication.


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LostAlien
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09 Jun 2010, 4:19 pm

Yupa wrote:
From my observation it isn't.

It looks like there are a lot of people on this forum who wave it around like a badge of pride. Not a good thing. You tell people out in the real world you have Asperger's, they see that as a disability and a bad thing. People are naturally uncomfortable around those they perceive as sick. If you tell someone you have Asperger's, they will think of you as mentally sick and try to avoid you.

It will also probably be extremely hard to land a job or make friends if you tell people publicly that you have a mental disorder.

If anything you should hide it and try to act normal. Believe it or not, it's not that hard.

When I say this I am not posting from anger to you specifically.

Where do you come from when you think it's easy to act normal? You have your own experience on the Spectrum. Other people have different experiences. I did try for a long time to pretend to be 'normal', all I got for it was ridicule and rejection. When I accepted myself as myself and not pretending anymore, I got friends and finally felt happier than I had been since a small child.

I don't go and tell everyone in sight, I tell people who I trust, people who I know see me. And I'm proud of what I've achieved despite my difficulties.



cyberscan
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09 Jun 2010, 4:21 pm

Ambivalence wrote:
Yupa wrote:
Do you think Asperger's is something to be proud of?


No.

Quote:
If you tell someone you have Asperger's, they will think of you as mentally sick and try to avoid you.


Not IME. I've had good support and understanding.

Quote:
If anything you should hide it and try to act normal. Believe it or not, it's not that hard.


You are wrong. You may yourself be able to act normal, and if you feel you should it's up to you, but you imply that that choice is open to all. It is not. It's pretty much not by definition, as an autism diagnosis requires impairment in interaction and communication.


I can act normal enough to make it through a job interview, but that is it. People pretty much know I'm different in just about every social situation.


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dyingofpoetry
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09 Jun 2010, 4:32 pm

I am proud of things that I have accomplished before anything else, but I'm also proud of the unique person that I am and Asperger's is part of that. So, I am not proud of my Asperger's, but it is one ingredient in making a me.


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hartzofspace
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09 Jun 2010, 4:41 pm

No. Not any more than being proud of being left-handed, or being tall or short.


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ruveyn
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09 Jun 2010, 4:44 pm

I blond hair something to be proud of. The only things to take pride in are things acquired by effort.

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conundrum
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09 Jun 2010, 4:57 pm

Michael_Stuart wrote:
Well, I don't believe in taking pride in things you didn't accomplish. As it takes no special effort to get Asperger's or an other ASD, I don't think you can really be proud of it. Of course, you can be proud of yourself for coping with problems that arise, or for achieving your full potential, but of having the condition itself I just I don't see it.

However, I don't believe in hiding who you are because of society's pressures. We've had that experiment run quite a few times in the 20th century, and it never worked. That's not to say I think it's wise or necessary to tell every person you meet all about Asperger's Syndrome. After all, telling them doesn't change who you are, and if they were going to accept you they'd do so even if you didn't tell them. It seems a bit of an attention-grab, though I'm not accusing.

You can be happy to have Asperger's Syndrome, but proud? Nah.


All true.

You can also be proud of a skill/talent that is easier for you due to having AS.

And, finally, while being proud of having AS may not make sense, not being ashamed of it definitely does. :D


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