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Jamesy
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05 Mar 2013, 6:24 pm

3 years ago I weighed between 168 and 182 pounds. Because I exercise and eat more healthy I currently weigh roughly 140 pounds... Sometimes I weigh between 140 and 154 pounds. In height I am 5'9 1/2.
daily diet and routine.

Wake at 10:30 or 11:00 in the morning.

Breakfast
Apple, orange, kiwi fruit, oat meal energy bar

11:30
Set of for 2 or 3 hours of intense cycling

2:45 in the afternoon
Snack time
4 slices of toast, uncle bens rice, chocolate bar

5:00 in the afternoon
Snack time
Banana, yogurt

6:45
Snack time
Might snack on crumpets or soup but it can varey

8:00
Dinner
It varies day too day what I eat at dinner but I often eat pasta for tea or chicken








I noticed that after dinner I still feel hungry. From the info above is there anything about my diet I could improve? On the weekends I eat more cause my parents are around too cook me more food.


I am 23 years old



eric76
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05 Mar 2013, 6:46 pm

When I used to ride bicycles about 3,000 to 5,000 miles per year, I had little problem maintaining my weight.

I eventually developed carpal tunnel syndrome and holding onto bicycle handlebars made it worse so I quit riding.

Since then, my weight has increased quite a bit.

Trying to watch what I eat doesn't seem to help.



goldfish21
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05 Mar 2013, 6:48 pm

Yes.

You're eating almost entirely carbohydrates, both simple and complex. You can't operate on almost entirely sugars. You need to eat more protein to build/maintain muscle mass as well as make the sugars you consume last longer as they'll burn off slower.



auntblabby
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05 Mar 2013, 6:51 pm

the reason you are still hungry is because your diet lacks micronutrients and also because your carbs are too often of the refined variety which means the body burns through them like a hot knife through butter. also there is no real benefit to hard aerobic exercise for over an hour a day, in fact some docs will say it causes oxydative damage to the body over time. eating small meals every 3 hours or so is not a bad idea in itself, but it doesn't mean you should eat quick-metabolising foods as the majority of your diet. an example of a slow-metabolising food would be good old-fashioned oatmeal, which your body will have to work at to metabolise, meaning you will have a smoother metering of energy throughout the day without periodic "crashes." just my old-folgy opinion.



auntblabby
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05 Mar 2013, 6:56 pm

eric76 wrote:
When I used to ride bicycles about 3,000 to 5,000 miles per year, I had little problem maintaining my weight. I eventually developed carpal tunnel syndrome and holding onto bicycle handlebars made it worse so I quit riding. Since then, my weight has increased quite a bit. Trying to watch what I eat doesn't seem to help.

some thoughts, por favor- if you eat the right foods, you won't have to "watch what you eat" or even mind portion sizes beyond a reasonable amount- trying to limit your daily calories, in general, is a lot like trying to limit how many times per minute you breathe- if you went on a breath diet of 10 respirations per minute when you really need 14 to survive, before long you will be hurting. same for food. avoiding refined carbs would be the single best thing you could do to take the burden off of your struggling willpower and help you to keep slim. as for carpal tunnel, that is avoidable by correct bicycle body mechanics, IOW leaning forwards as a regular biking posture is no-no. consider a recumbent bike. since my accident last summer, i've sworn off bikes and now i either powerwalk every day [for an hour] or if it is warm enough i will take out my recumbent trike and ride, i can't so readily get knocked off of a trike.



Jamesy
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05 Mar 2013, 7:37 pm

Aunt blabby - could oxyadative damage make my autism worse?



auntblabby
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05 Mar 2013, 8:08 pm

Jamesy wrote:
Aunt blabby - could oxidative damage make my autism worse?

hmmm... :scratch:
from what i have found, a definite maybe. a quote from a page about glutathione-

Scientists have identified a signature metabolic impairment or "biomarker" in autistic children that strongly suggests that these children would be susceptible to the harmful effects of mercury and other toxic chemical exposures (James 2004a).

This impairment manifests as a severe imbalance in the ratio of active to inactive glutathione, the body's most important tool for detoxifying and excreting metals. Glutathione works as an antioxidant, keeping in check the potentially destructive process of oxidative stress caused both by normal metabolism and environmental contaminants. Autistic children showed a significant impairment in every one of five measurements of the body's ability to maintain a healthy glutathione defense.

These findings raise serious concerns about children's overall exposure to environmental contaminants. Mercury is of particular concern, however, because of its proven toxicity to the developing brain and nervous system, and documented high exposures from a variety of sources. One of every six pregnancies is exposed to methyl mercury above EPA's safe level from maternal consumption of contaminated seafood (CDC 2002, Mahaffey 2004).


(clicky)this page is controversial because it involves thimerisol, but it is an absorbing read nonetheless.



eric76
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05 Mar 2013, 8:27 pm

auntblabby wrote:
eric76 wrote:
When I used to ride bicycles about 3,000 to 5,000 miles per year, I had little problem maintaining my weight. I eventually developed carpal tunnel syndrome and holding onto bicycle handlebars made it worse so I quit riding. Since then, my weight has increased quite a bit. Trying to watch what I eat doesn't seem to help.

some thoughts, por favor- if you eat the right foods, you won't have to "watch what you eat" or even mind portion sizes beyond a reasonable amount- trying to limit your daily calories, in general, is a lot like trying to limit how many times per minute you breathe- if you went on a breath diet of 10 respirations per minute when you really need 14 to survive, before long you will be hurting. same for food. avoiding refined carbs would be the single best thing you could do to take the burden off of your struggling willpower and help you to keep slim. as for carpal tunnel, that is avoidable by correct bicycle body mechanics, IOW leaning forwards as a regular biking posture is no-no. consider a recumbent bike. since my accident last summer, i've sworn off bikes and now i either powerwalk every day [for an hour] or if it is warm enough i will take out my recumbent trike and ride, i can't so readily get knocked off of a trike.


I've never tried restricting calories. I usually concentrate more on what I eat and avoiding certain foods.

As for biking, a recumbent might be a good idea. My preference has always been the regular road bikes.

I remember reading that recumbents don't generally do well on hills. My area is normally quite flat with occasional canyons along the creeks. Going to town from home, I would have to cross such a canyon/creek no matter what route I took. How do recumbents do in comparison to other bikes for weight? Pushing one up the far side of a canyon is definitely a concern.

One of my absolute requirements is to be able to carry it on a standard bike rack. The reason is that there are far too many goat heads in the ditches near the house. My experience here is that during much of the year, you could be pretty sure about having at least one flat tire per mile of travel when not on the paved highway. It happens on the highway, but far from as frequently on the local dirt or caliche roads. My solution is to put the bike on the bike rack and drive the mile over to the church and park the car in the parking lot while riding the bike.



auntblabby
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05 Mar 2013, 8:51 pm

eric76 wrote:
I remember reading that recumbents don't generally do well on hills. My area is normally quite flat with occasional canyons along the creeks. Going to town from home, I would have to cross such a canyon/creek no matter what route I took. How do recumbents do in comparison to other bikes for weight? Pushing one up the far side of a canyon is definitely a concern.

the advantage of recumbents in hill-climbing is that your backrest provides something for you to push against when you pedal, this is almost as useful as gravity on an upright bike. but on any good 'bent your gears are your friends- mine [sun classic ex-3 recumbent trike] is geared for hill-climbing with a granny low gear/granny low range. granted at top speed you can barely outrun a dog while pedaling full tilt, but that is a tradeoff this broken and healing body of mine will now accept. as for weight, it weighs as much as two good uprights, about 65#, but for me this is an advantage in that it is very stable, IOW i can't readily be knocked off this trike like i was knocked off my upright giant suede dx when that damned deer decided to cross my path. i climb all the short hills in my neighborhood, slowly but surely. as for long canyon hills, probably i'm too wimpy for those. :oops:

eric76 wrote:
One of my absolute requirements is to be able to carry it on a standard bike rack. The reason is that there are far too many goat heads in the ditches near the house. My experience here is that during much of the year, you could be pretty sure about having at least one flat tire per mile of travel when not on the paved highway. It happens on the highway, but far from as frequently on the local dirt or caliche roads. My solution is to put the bike on the bike rack and drive the mile over to the church and park the car in the parking lot while riding the bike.

i wish i could haul mine on a standard bike rack but no, it requires a trailer with security straps. its tires are meant for streets and not for goatheads, i'm sure glad those demonic things aren't in the northwest. being 6'3" [mostly legs] there is no regular-sized bike [which would fit better inside a vehicle or outside on a rack] that will work for me. but once you've ridden on the sun classic ez3 it basically sells itself :thumleft: it is like riding on nothing else.



mercifullyfree
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05 Mar 2013, 8:54 pm

Replace a lot of those carbs with protein. Fat is better than sugar.



auntblabby
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05 Mar 2013, 8:54 pm

as long as none of those fats are saturated.



cathylynn
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05 Mar 2013, 10:17 pm

eat some veggies. they fill you up with only a few calories. plus they have lots of vitamins and anti-oxidants.



auntblabby
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05 Mar 2013, 11:11 pm

it is a challenge to prepare veggies in a way that makes them taste good rather than acridly cardboardy.



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06 Mar 2013, 12:59 am

auntblabby wrote:
as long as none of those fats are saturated.


Saturated fats are good for you. These are the healthy fats. Mono-saturated (olive oils) is also good.



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06 Mar 2013, 1:10 am

Breakfast
Apple, orange or kiwi fruit,
Eggs

11:30
Set of for 2 or 3 hours of intense cycling

2:45 in the afternoon
Snack time
Meat (chicken wings, left over pork chops, premade skewers, meatballs, etc)
Fresh vegetables (carrot sticks, cucumber/tomato salad, tossed salad, etc)

5:00 in the afternoon
Snack time
Banana, yogurt (organic)

6:45
Snack time
Homemade soup

8:00
Dinner
Cup of soup
Meat (pork chops, chicken, meatloaf, salmon, etc)
Vegetables (mashed cauliflower, peas, grilled turnip wedges, beets, etc)

You should only have 2-3 servings of fruit a day (one banana is one serving)
Eat meat or drink meat broth several times per day
Keep a healthy balance between meat and vegetables

Drink fresh water throughout the day.
Cook your food with ghee, coconut oil, or animal fats.
Use cold-pressed olive oil as a garnish.
Get rid of all your vegetable oils.



auntblabby
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06 Mar 2013, 1:21 am

ASDsmom wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
as long as none of those fats are saturated.


Saturated fats are good for you. These are the healthy fats. Mono-saturated (olive oils) is also good.

i beg to differ only because i saw with my own eyes the effects of saturated fats on the interior of an aorta during a triple-A procedure done several decades back when i worked in the OR, the doctor was scooping out this orangey/yelloow-ey greazy stuff out of a splayed-open section of aorta, and i asked him "what is that greazy stuff?" to which the surgeon replied, "oh, about 5000 big macs."