How do level 2 people do at high school and post-secondary?

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SplendidSnail
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15 Feb 2018, 9:47 pm

I know that, with level 1 ASD, people generally do pretty well in high school and post-secondary education (academically at least), but then often have difficulties getting or holding a job.

How about with level 2? I know that at level 2, there is no "passing" - if you look at the person, you immediately know something is different about the person. But do people with level 2 ASD tend to do have a similar level of academic success with high school and post secondary education?


EDIT: Modified wording as per bunnyb's very good suggestion below.


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Last edited by SplendidSnail on 15 Feb 2018, 10:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

bunnyb
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15 Feb 2018, 9:55 pm

First off, I would prefer it if you would say 'something is different' rather than 'something isn't "normal"' The whole normal in inverted commas isn't nice, anyway, yes it's possible. I did final year high school subjects when I was 12. I was considered "gifted" (yes it's in inverted commas because I think the term gifted isn't nice too) and I have a degree which I didn't have to try very hard to get. Prior to a brain injury I had a photographic memory and auditory eidetic memory. Uni was easy.


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SplendidSnail
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15 Feb 2018, 10:01 pm

bunnyb wrote:
First off, I would prefer it if you would say 'something is different' rather than 'something isn't "normal"' The whole normal in inverted commas isn't nice

Very sorry - didn't mean it that way at all. In fact, I think I'll edit my OP to use your very good suggestion.


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bunnyb
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15 Feb 2018, 11:00 pm

Sorry if I sounded snappy but "not normal" are two words that have followed me all my life. I was identified as "not normal" at a young age but nobody thought autism because I was female. It was initially hoped I would grow into being normal but I was taken to my first psychiatrist when I was 9 because I wasn't showing any signs of growing out of my "not normalness" At 13 I was sectioned and put in an psychiatric institution, not because I was mentally ill but because I was "not normal" so those words are rather emotive for me. I have been judged and found wanting so many, many times. To quote Temple Grandin, I am different, not less. :)


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SplendidSnail
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15 Feb 2018, 11:29 pm

Just read your initial reply again, bunnyb, with less of a lens of worrying that I'd offended you, and noticed that you said you graduated from high school at age 12. (apologies for not noticing it the first time!)

Wow! That's amazing! I've heard of people who have done things like graduating at age 12, but never actually communicated with someone who has actually done it! Very cool!
:)


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elsapelsa
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16 Feb 2018, 5:04 am

I am wondering this myself a lot of the time. Not necessarily in relation to level 2 but in relation to AS in general. I feel it is really unfair because in the right circumstances people can absolutely excel, shine and be among the top achievers whereas in poor circumstances they might end up with hardly any education at all and the education they receive might come at the cost of stress and mis-management of their AS. If feels so utterly unfair to me that it is that relative. In fact it really bothers me that super intelligent sharp people don't get the right access or have their access thwarted because the environment can't shift to accommodate their needs whether they be sensory issues, learning styles, or whatever... I think why it bothers me so much is that it just perpetuates mediocracy and I just hate the loss of talent and different ways of seeing.


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16 Feb 2018, 12:48 pm

I'm a level 2 ( I think that's what my papers say, at least). I struggled in high school a lot, not only with social interaction and trying to fit in and make friends, but also with keeping up with my classes. I eventually graduated with passing grades, but I was always falling behind and had difficulty focusing on anything that didn't interest me. I had a few supports and an IEP but they weren't the best to be honest and I think that my supports could have been more tailored to my condition and needs and less generic, but I also understand why they did what they did.

I haven't finished college. I've tried twice and might go back for a third try sometime, but I just am never successful unless I only take one class at a time.


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bunnyb
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16 Feb 2018, 5:29 pm

SplendidSnail wrote:
Just read your initial reply again, bunnyb, with less of a lens of worrying that I'd offended you, and noticed that you said you graduated from high school at age 12. (apologies for not noticing it the first time!)

Wow! That's amazing! I've heard of people who have done things like graduating at age 12, but never actually communicated with someone who has actually done it! Very cool!
:)


It's unfortunately not as cool as it sounds. Nobody knew what to do with me. I was too young for Uni and too young to leave school so they expected me to repeat final year until I was old enough for Uni. My Uncle had gone to Uni at 15 and they said I could do that too but I didn't like the idea. 15 seemed too far away so I started acting out and got myself locked up in an Institution. Despite being 13, they put me on an adult ward and it was truly horrifying. Psychotic people running around the ward screaming all hours of the day and night. It was a cruel and unusual punishment for an unhappy child.


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elbowgrease
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16 Feb 2018, 5:58 pm

I'm at level 2, apparently.
School was pretty easy for me, generally. Could have easily done the GED test (high school equivalency) at 12. I think sixth grade was the last year that I actually tried to do anything, was the salutatorian that year. Would have been the valedictorian but I spent half the year in a psych ward. Basically quit school at 13. Long story. Got thrown out of my mom's for the first time then. Went to school until the middle of my 10th grade year, but didn't do anything. Tried to go to an independent school where you study at your own pace, but almost got arrested there on the second day because I was underage and homeless. Got a GED a year and a half early. Didn't study for it at all. (I've never actually had to study for anything.) Had to wait until I was 24 to go to college. First semester was great. Top of all my classes. Absolutely shocked my history teacher. Did a total of five semesters, I think. Had huge mountains of stress building up in my life during that time and watched my grades fall accordingly.
I have problems with math that no one would ever believe me about before. Would like to think that I may get some recognition of that next time around. Plan to go back again, and even try to have some fun with it. Try to apply myself and see what happens. Part of the problem with college is that I really have no interest in a degree, there isn't just one thing that I want to study, I want to study everything. Degree programs for financial aid are really narrow though.

Anyway.
School is one of the only things that actually is easy for me. Everything else has pretty much been a mess.



Last edited by elbowgrease on 16 Feb 2018, 6:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.

kraftiekortie
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16 Feb 2018, 6:17 pm

It's an absolute pity that things had to happen to you like that, Bunny.

It's not fair.

It would have been good if there was a "gifted" program where you live. You could have taken "accelerated" classes at your grade level.



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16 Feb 2018, 6:45 pm

elbowgrease wrote:
I'm at level 2, apparently.

I have problems with math that no one would ever believe me about before. Would like to think that I may get some recognition of that next time around. School is one of the only things that actually is easy for me. Everything else has pretty much been a mess.


Some of us need to get active in the spring mentality to apply more moderate focus on ourselves, for when the time is right to enhance our mental and cognitive abilities., which should broaden our outtake on modern life as it is.
My second run at college again was at 23, but I've carried on until this day. Maths was not something I could become particularly skilled about either.. so level 2 is completely acceptable., and whilst I think my time with it is nearly over, I pray for my next assessment stage on the subject for when I wish to enter another course and placement. God just give me some hindsight into how to make those odd numbers pay! Well, if I mess this up, the school will be missing a good pupil.. until that stage beckons I may have to upgrade the sheer level of inconsistency I've had with it up until now.



bunnyb
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16 Feb 2018, 10:00 pm

@elbowgrease - it's lovely to meet you. It's nice to know I'm not the only one who's been screwed over by being "gifted" :roll: I left home on my 15th birthday and lived on the streets for a while. I did bucket loads of drugs hoping that if I killed off enough brain cells I might become normal :? Didn't work :ninja:
When I hear Aspie surpremists bang on about how wonderful it is to be superior to NT's, I know they are not as smart as they think they are. If they were like us they would be too damaged to want to brag about their amazing intelligence. Being like us is hard.

@Kraftie - Thanks :heart:


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elbowgrease
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16 Feb 2018, 10:40 pm

It's nice to meet you, too.
It still really blows me away to actually relate to anyone. Especially about stuff like this.
I was going back and forth about whether to post in this thread until I read your post and thought, it sounds a lot like my story.

Sometimes I do get sort of puffed up about intelligence, I must admit. Sometimes I have to remind myself that I'm not actually stupid, and actively remember that I... Otherwise I wouldn't have anything to feel good about. But what good is it, really?
That's the nightmare. Or part of the nightmare, anyway.

I dabbled with drugs a little bit. I luckily wasn't able to handle them at all, and never got out of control with anything. I have a theory about that.



kraftiekortie
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16 Feb 2018, 10:42 pm

It's obvious you're not stupid.

Nothing wrong with being proud of your intelligence.



Lumi
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16 Feb 2018, 10:59 pm

Only mainstream classes for me. I barely got through high school (with depression and really made 1 friend), as my autism did not receive any attention. In college, I quit after the first semester and was only taking two classes, with a few accommodations. I think I know more about my weaknesses and what accommodations I can ask for now, should I choose to return.


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elbowgrease
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16 Feb 2018, 11:19 pm

Thank you kraftie.