What are some low-stress jobs we could do?

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cyberpunk
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19 Apr 2018, 3:59 pm

Any ideas are welcome. Here are some of mine
- Nursing home (low-level assistant)
- Customer service (email/telephone)
- Quality control at a factory



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19 Apr 2018, 4:48 pm

I worked part time from home as a publishing editor and book reviewer as a sideline for a few years. It was a good fit because I could do it in my own time, undisturbed, working alone, and enjoyed the thoughtful correspondence with the novelists, which often developed beyond the scope of my editing role, as writing professionally is a lonely occupation. For those of us who are good at spotting patterns, good with written language, have a wide reading history and who love books and ideas, it can be a good fit, though it isn't particularly well paid.



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19 Apr 2018, 5:20 pm

cyberpunk wrote:
Any ideas are welcome. Here are some of mine
- Nursing home (low-level assistant)
- Customer service (email/telephone)
- Quality control at a factory

I'm sorry, but working in a nursing home is definitely not a low stress job. It's very fast paced and a lot of the people you'll be caring for are total care residents usually very frail/ill, meaning you'll be assigned 10 or more people that all need help with toileting, transfers, feeding, dressing, bathing, etc. I used to work as a CNA before I became a nurse, and I lasted a month in a nursing home because it was too stressful for me and I couldn't keep up with the pace.

Now as a nurse, I do home health for a pediatric client. She's total care, but transferring her is easy and I can work at my own pace. I have had cases though where the child wasn't medically stable and was on a ventilator and that was pretty stressful as I was alone (I no longer do vent or medically unstable patients anymore).

The child I'm working with now is pretty easy, as I've said, and I have a lot of down time in between providing nursing care. She is pretty stable, and I have the same routine with her every day and I don't have to worry about coworkers breathing down my neck.



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21 Apr 2018, 12:57 am

Custodial/janitorial if you work in a place after hours. I've done that but it was retail during open hours. I didn't mind the jobs too much thou when management left me alone to do my work. Dealing with he customers & other workers wasn't that difficult for me but some Aspies will have major problems with that.

I will also suggest dishwashing if your an Aspie who can handle rush hour or you work during off-peak hours. That was my 1st job & I didn't mind it too much except I didn't like rush-hour & the chemicals were bad for my skin but I have skin allergies & eczema.


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21 Apr 2018, 1:09 am

cyberpunk wrote:
- Quality control at a factory

I did this work for a while. The actual work itself was pretty good, sometimes interesting, and a good general fit for an aspie. As with any job, however, everything depends on the people around/above you. After I had been there a while the company hired a quality manager who was the second absolutely genuine sociopath that I've ever encountered. Within a couple months it became intolerable because I wouldn't participate in his lying and coverups, and he got rid of me because I was a threat. (I was glad to go at that point.) So yes, a quality control job is a good choice as work, if you have decent people around you.


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21 Apr 2018, 4:48 am

Low stress? Depends entirely on who you ask; different people see different things as stressing. For example someone with good social skills might be great at customer service but bad at things that require thinking outside of NT common sense, as in that person might not be able to handle even simple machines or something. Then there could be an autistic person who could see even a very basic customer service situation as overwhelming yet be able to use far more complicated machines than the NT above. The NT of this examble would likely find jobs including machines stressing since he/she can't handle them, while the autistic person of this examble would find jobs including customer service stresssing. After all, it is stressing to do something you're bad at.

All that said, I'm currently working as a digitizer at a chancery and so far it's the least stressful job I've ever done. The only thing that stresses me there is the fact that my job is only part time so I have a very low income, but the job itself isn't a problem.



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21 Apr 2018, 4:29 pm

Overnight stockers. I see these people wearing street cloths, headphones, and stocking shelves without having to say a word to anybody.


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22 Apr 2018, 5:57 am

Homer_Bob wrote:
Overnight stockers. I see these people wearing street cloths, headphones, and stocking shelves without having to say a word to anybody.
That's not how it is at WalMart. You have to wear a uniform, headphones aren't allowed & you have to talk to managers, other coworkers, & customers if the store is open 24hours which the one I worked at was. I didn't do stocking thou, I did floor-cleaning. I guess it depends on the store. If the store is closed at night & not part of a chain where some are open & some aren't, things are probably alot more lax.


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28 Apr 2018, 2:28 pm

I started as a baker. They're more likely to take you if you've worked with food, but there's no schooling, certification, etc, necessary to get hired. I talk to customers sometimes, but mostly I'm working alone. Only downside is early mornings but it's not hard work, just have to work moderately fast, follow safety standards, etc.



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29 Apr 2018, 4:39 pm

I work at a bus garage cleaning buses. I'd say it's very Aspie-friendly. There isn't much pressure or rules and it's not a demanding job. I'm very happy and relaxed in my job. :D
The only thing that might upset some Aspies is loud noises. The buses can be loud if the engines are running and they backfire or something (sometimes you have to turn engines on to get light or heat if it's dark or cold outside). But that doesn't bother me much.


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30 Apr 2018, 7:03 am

Data entry jobs are probably becoming more and more rare since more and more companies are going paperless but it can be good if you can avoid being bored by it. Personally I used to practically fall asleep due to the lack of stimulation. There are also medical billing and coding and transcription jobs (although transcription is probably on its way out too)

Technical writing is probably great for any language-skilled aspie!

Design jobs (graphic, presentation, decorating, marketing, data, etc) are great for anyone who is an engineer at heart.

Engineering... is great for someone who is willing to get a degree for it! Sometimes I kind of wish I had stayed in school so that I could have become an engineer. There are so many business areas that require engineers: Electrical
architectural, industrial, software, mechanical, civil, biomedical, aerospace... etc etc etc...


Quality Assurance is good, I agree with that. Although eventually if you make your way into quality management that becomes a super-high-social-nuance job... It'd be easier to be a leader in a different area.

Which leads me to the next idea that most people probably don't think about: shift supervisor. That is, someone who has a penchant for understanding and working with rules and standards and has at least a little bit of interest in business could potentially thrive in a people-leadership role... I know you're probably thinking "but Infinite, that's such a social job"... but it's social with a set of rules, routines, the job repeats itself frequently, you can build systems with triggers for action and execute if you think in the right ways about it :) personally I love social stuff as long as there are reasons for everything so maybe I am biased. Note: this really only works in a pro-diversity organization... If you're going to get hammered for having unusual approaches to leadership it's not worth trying. If you can get away with redesigning the system though it could work :) I am known as a great people leader in my company but I've gotten too high up for it to be low-stess so I definitely wouldn't recommend higher management if you want to avoid stress... team supervisor is probably about the limit for that.

I'm sure I could think of others but these are my initial thoughts :)


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