Atypical's 2nd Season is a Step Forward in Autism Representation

Page 1 of 3 [ 37 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

alex
Developer
Developer

User avatar

Joined: 13 Jun 2004
Age: 32
Gender: Male
Posts: 10,086
Location: Beverly Hills, CA

30 Sep 2018, 11:47 am


 
My criticisms of Atypical’s freshman season were certainly no secret, as I shared my feelings both publicly in various news outlets and privately with Robia Rashid, the show’s creator.  At the time, I mentioned that a lot of issues could be fixed, but my biggest problem with season one was the lack of autistic involvement.  To remedy this problem, I suggested that, at the very least, an autistic consultant needed to be hired for season two.  Fortunately my suggestion was taken to heart, and with the addition of autistic consultant David Finch many of the show’s major problems have been ...



B19
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jan 2013
Gender: Female
Posts: 9,240
Location: New Zealand

30 Sep 2018, 4:50 pm

Great that you are gradually reshaping their preconceptions. It seems to me that NTs are very rarely capable of developing a nuanced conception of AS, which is a precursor to nuanced depictions on screen. I see the reason for this as basically that they have always seen and learned about AS through the trite stereotypes served up by media and "autism experts" (whose comments are prefaced on research done on young male children, though they apply them to adults). These same experts would never look at research done on NT children and apply it will nilly to all NT adults.

Nuanced perceptual thinking is the opposite of stereotypical thinking. If you can help build a bridge from their country of stereotypes to the country of AS nuanced reality and diversity, then - as the Brits say! - your bloods worth bottling :)

The only nuanced depiction of an AS adult I have seen was Benedict Cumberbatch's Alan Turing in the magnificent film The Imitation Game. It was very subtle and most people seemed unaware of, and therefore they missed the sprinkling of AS complexity throughout the film which stood out like the proverbial sore toe to me (and was true to the extremely thorough biography that depiction was based upon). Maybe you could bring up the film casually and discuss it with the people at Atypical which could perhaps open another door to more nuanced conceptualisations.

The show hasn't screened here so I haven't seen it, I will look it up though online.



ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 61
Gender: Male
Posts: 16,913
Location: Long Island, New York

30 Sep 2018, 7:36 pm

I do not have Netflix nor intend to get it but I am glad the show is making rapid progress and I thank you and the other Autistic advocates and the shows writers for making it happen.

Many times representation is maddingly frustrating. As autistics, we often get caught up in the flaws and miss the "big picture". The "big picture" is that in the 5 years since I found out I am autistic there has been a lot of progress. Autistic adult lead characters in a Hollywood blockbuster and a popular Network TV show, autistic characters being labeled autistic, media stories depicting autistics accomplishing things. I expected some of those things to take a generation to happen never mind all of them in 5 years.


_________________
Every idea is an incitement - Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes

Recovering from tongue cancer, somewhat verbal.
Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity


Magna
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 21 Jun 2018
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,571

30 Sep 2018, 8:01 pm

Thank you for helping as you have with Atypical, Alex. My sentiments of season one vs season two are spot on with yours in your article. I've said it in another Atypical related thread here, but it bears repeating: I've watched Sam's group session scenes probably 20 times now, just those scenes. That's how much I liked them. It's great how each fellow member of Sam's group session are different. Noelle with her lightening fast "Prove it!" to Sam's dancing claim and her genuine admission, Lily with her slight verbal challenges, etc. His group is all so different and that's so great.

I'm bummed since he graduated it wouldn't be believable for him to be in that same great high school group any longer and there's no reason for his group members to be in the same school he's planning on going to. :cry:


_________________
"There is no love of living without despair of life." - Albert Camus
"There can be beauty in melancholy; it's an acquired taste." - Magna

AQ-43 (32-50 indicates a strong likelihood of Asperger syndrome or autism).
EQ-14 out of 80
Rdos: Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 173 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 39 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


SaveFerris
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2016
Age: 47
Gender: Male
Posts: 9,401
Location: UK

30 Sep 2018, 8:42 pm

Pants On Fire Technique :lol: Everyone needs a Zahid in their life


_________________
R Tape loading error, 0:1

Hypocrisy is the greatest luxury. Raise the double standard


SaveFerris
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2016
Age: 47
Gender: Male
Posts: 9,401
Location: UK

01 Oct 2018, 8:10 am

I loved it so much I binged it in one go ( finished about 7 a.m. this morning :shaking: :lol: )


_________________
R Tape loading error, 0:1

Hypocrisy is the greatest luxury. Raise the double standard


pasty
Raven
Raven

Joined: 30 Sep 2016
Gender: Female
Posts: 120
Location: Southeast USA

01 Oct 2018, 4:01 pm

"And if you’re looking for an autistic actor to play him, contact my agent."
Or her. It could be a female.



andy33
Butterfly
Butterfly

Joined: 21 Jun 2017
Age: 40
Gender: Male
Posts: 12

01 Oct 2018, 4:42 pm

I try to watch any show that explores Autism
but being Asexual I cannot relate to the character at all. It all seems to be about lust and pursuing sex.



madbutnotmad
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

Joined: 20 Nov 2016
Age: 45
Gender: Male
Posts: 231
Location: Jersey UK

01 Oct 2018, 4:42 pm

I really enjoyed the 1st season, and am now half way through the second.

I find it upbeat, humours, cheeky, as well as good at covering numerous issues on autism. Which is very educational especially for people who have no idea that autism, especially Asperger syndrome or high functioning / or very high functioning autism (which I have).

I have also found watching the show very painful at times, and it has brought me to tears. Perhaps at times which others would not understand.

The reason being is that some of the topics or situations remind me of my own life or contrast as to how different people treated me when I grew up. Let me explain. I am one of the many late diagnosis people, who have been given a diagnosis way late in life.

This meant that I have spent my entire life suffering from a disability that I (nor anyone else) even knew I had.

This meant that I did not receive the support and understanding from people around me, or in life in general, and instead of being protected by a kind sister, i was ridiculed and tormented by an older brother, and his friends, and the people who i went to school with.

So it was very painful to see someone doing the opposite.

I also note that I have spent my entire life having intellectual and creative works stolen, from people who aren't as talented as i am (music, art) and who aren't as honest or sincere as i am.

And after they stole and took credit for all the things that they stole, they then got everyone who they knew to victimise me. Which, when you live on a small 7 x 9 island, is really tough.

So, perhaps you can understand. that in areas I would find the contrast upsetting, but also the lack of understanding in the area that i live, also extremely frustrating.

Still, I think that the series will help a lot of people gain a better understanding into the invisible condition, which may hopefully help change how people treat people with ASD, even in the bigoted island of finance industry sociopaths that i unfortunately am trapped on.

So, cool. awesome. Very enjoyable. Keep it up dudes!



Illuminata
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

Joined: 28 Jan 2017
Age: 41
Gender: Female
Posts: 3
Location: Tennessee

01 Oct 2018, 5:00 pm

Let's take it further than just having an adult on the spectrum. What's vexing me in the South where I am an autistic rights advocate is that not all autistic people are white, affluent males. In fact, there are far more females and minorities on the spectrum than previously thought because of bias in the diagnostic criteria. Can we not have an autistic girl or person of a different background? Why not a gay autistic person? Why not an encounter for the main character with a peer who has been misdiagnosed and he doesn't know how to handle that information or tell that person? Let's really branch out and include autistic people who have been tragically missed by media depictions!! !



Autonomous_Bay
Hummingbird
Hummingbird

Joined: 30 Sep 2018
Age: 43
Gender: Female
Posts: 22
Location: Vancouver, WA

01 Oct 2018, 5:39 pm

I love the show. It could be called "Stereotypical" instead of "Atypical", but I still think it's awesome and I'm so glad they wrote a show about it. My criticism of it is that it's very atypical of real families to care about idiosyncrasies and quirks. I hope that someone makes a show or movie about how it is for people on the mild side of the spectrum, how they get judged and all that raw stuff that is hidden. In real life the family treats ASD kids like black sheep. The mother is one of those modern warrior moms who fight for their kids, but most moms pander to society and not fight so much for their children's rights. For this reason it comes off as a comedy more so than a drama. I guess that's better because no one really wants to see the icky side of society. Nobody wants to learn lessons from a Netflix show. Well, not nobody but you get it.

The show is really funny though. I especially like the Indian stoner guy.

Ever see the series "Parenthood"? That had an asperger character, well two actually. I binged on that one too.



B19
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jan 2013
Gender: Female
Posts: 9,240
Location: New Zealand

01 Oct 2018, 10:23 pm

Some commentary in this link with some relevance to this thread's topic:

http://www.madisonhouseautism.org/hey-n ... nk-things/



NickysMom2003
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

Joined: 9 Sep 2016
Gender: Female
Posts: 1
Location: Tennessee

02 Oct 2018, 10:48 am

I agree that the second season was far superior to the first in many ways. I think I even filled out a survey for Netflix. I’m glad they toned down the sexual content as it was quite I comfortable last season watching with my 14 year old son at times, but he still enjoyed it. He and I both thought this season was excellent and we hate having to wait so long for the next one. He really loved seeing the behaviors of Sam that are much like his own, but done in a tasteful and humorous way. It’s up there as one of our favorite shows.



alex
Developer
Developer

User avatar

Joined: 13 Jun 2004
Age: 32
Gender: Male
Posts: 10,086
Location: Beverly Hills, CA

02 Oct 2018, 11:26 am

Thanks for all your feedback! Keep it coming. 8)

I interviewed my friend David Finch who served as a consultant for the 2nd season. Would you all be interested if I released that interview on the site?


_________________
Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/alexplank

Personal FB: http://fb.me/alexplank1


AspieUtah
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Age: 56
Gender: Male
Posts: 6,118
Location: Brigham City, Utah

02 Oct 2018, 11:36 am

andy33 wrote:
I try to watch any show that explores Autism
but being Asexual I cannot relate to the character at all. It all seems to be about lust and pursuing sex.

Valid concern. I can't relate to any of the characters' descriptive lives. It seems to me to be a series on par with The Goldbergs where self-deprecating vaudevillian humor passes for universal expectations. Or, maybe it is geared to an audience of the high-school kind. Beats me.

Gimme my Touch and The Good Doctor, instead.


_________________
Diagnosed in 2015 with ASD Level 1 by the University of Utah Health Care Autism Spectrum Disorder Clinic using the ADOS-2 Module 4 assessment instrument [11/30] -- Screened in 2014 with ASD by using the University of Cambridge Autism Research Centre AQ (Adult) [43/50]; EQ-60 for adults [11/80]; FQ [43/135]; SQ (Adult) [130/150] self-reported screening inventories -- Assessed since 1978 with an estimated IQ [≈145] by several clinicians -- Contact on WrongPlanet.net by private message (PM)