Question if you can be Autistic and still have social skills

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FranzOren
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03 Sep 2020, 8:42 pm

Can you have neurotypical social skills and still have ASD?



For example, you developed social skills in time, but you had history of sensory issues and repetitive thoughts or behaviors that caused you great distress from early childhood



Another example is that you can have some kind of rare form of Pervasive Developmental Disorder, with neurotypical traits



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03 Sep 2020, 8:49 pm

FranzOren wrote:
Can you have neurotypical social skills and still have ASD?



For example, you developed social skills in time, but you had history of sensory issues and repetitive thoughts or behaviors that caused you great distress from early childhood



Another example is that you can have some kind of rare form of Pervasive Developmental Disorder, with neurotypical traits

No No No No No. And yous aid ti yoursel fyou dind't develop social skills in time. Simply put neurotypical social skills would mean you don't have autism.


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FranzOren
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03 Sep 2020, 8:54 pm

Pieplup wrote:
FranzOren wrote:
Can you have neurotypical social skills and still have ASD?



For example, you developed social skills in time, but you had history of sensory issues and repetitive thoughts or behaviors that caused you great distress from early childhood



Another example is that you can have some kind of rare form of Pervasive Developmental Disorder, with neurotypical traits

No No No No No. And yous aid ti yoursel fyou dind't develop social skills in time. Simply put neurotypical social skills would mean you don't have autism.





I know, but I was asking what if you just had sensory issues and repetitive thoughts or behaviors that caused you great distress from early childhood.


What will parents or you do in this situation?


Let's just imagine what the scenario will be.



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03 Sep 2020, 8:57 pm

FranzOren wrote:
Pieplup wrote:
FranzOren wrote:
Can you have neurotypical social skills and still have ASD?



For example, you developed social skills in time, but you had history of sensory issues and repetitive thoughts or behaviors that caused you great distress from early childhood



Another example is that you can have some kind of rare form of Pervasive Developmental Disorder, with neurotypical traits

No No No No No. And yous aid ti yoursel fyou dind't develop social skills in time. Simply put neurotypical social skills would mean you don't have autism.





I know, but I was asking what if you just had sensory issues and repetitive thoughts or behaviors that caused you great distress from early childhood.


What will parents or you do in this situation?


Let's just imagine what the scenario will be.

Weel assuming all that doesn't cause social impairment which i don't understand how it wouldn't. I guess they'd get diagnosed with something else cause they don't fit in the criteria


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FranzOren
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03 Sep 2020, 9:02 pm

For example, you only had these symptoms and it caused you distress from early to childhood.


Here are the symptoms:

Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities, as manifested
by at least two of the following, currently or by history (examples are illustrative,
not exhaustive; see text):

1. Stereotyped or repetitive motor movements, use of objects, or speech
(e.g., simple motor stereotypes, lining up toys or flipping objects, echolalia,
idiosyncratic phrases).

2. Insistence on sameness, inflexible adherence to routines, or ritualized
patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior (e.g., extreme distress at small
changes, difficulties with transitions, rigid thinking patterns, greeting rituals,
need to take same route or eat same food every day).

3. Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus
(e.g., strong attachment to or preoccupation with unusual objects,
excessively circumscribed or perseverative interests).

4. Hyper- or hyporeactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory
aspects of the environment (e.g. apparent indifference to pain/temperature,
adverse response to specific sounds or textures, excessive smelling or
touching of objects, visual fascination with lights or movement).



FranzOren
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03 Sep 2020, 9:19 pm

I think the diagnostic criteria for Autism is a little too restrictive, because since Autism is a spectrum, I think you could have developed social skills in time and still be Autistic, but it was not diagnosed until much later in life or was never diagnosed.



The reason why I say that is because my psychiatrist explained that since Autism is a spectrum disorder, you can have developed social skills in time, but only had symptoms that includes, restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior that has caused you distress from early to late childhood.



Also symptoms that includes, restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior can be a social impairment as well, but can understand social cues and emotions.



Last edited by FranzOren on 03 Sep 2020, 10:36 pm, edited 2 times in total.

FranzOren
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03 Sep 2020, 9:34 pm

The third reason why I said this, it is because females tend to present symptoms of Autism differently then males and they tend to have social skills better than males



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03 Sep 2020, 9:49 pm

FranzOren wrote:
Can you have neurotypical social skills and still have ASD?



FranzOren wrote:
The reason why I say that is because my psychiatrist explained that since Autism is a spectrum disorder, you can have developed social skills in time, but had some only had symptoms that includes, restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior that has caused you distress from early childhood to late childhood.

Also symptoms that includes, restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior can be a social impairment as well, but can understand social cues and emotions.


Your social skills usually improve with age but to say they are "neurotypical" is not credible. Typically we still have to put more effort into our limited social skills than a neurotypical puts in to their social skills.


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FranzOren
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03 Sep 2020, 9:56 pm

I was asking if you could have developed social skills in time, but had restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior that caused you great distress from early childhood.


I do I think if you had only symptoms of restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior that caused you great distress from early childhood, you have social deficit, but you can absolutely understand and read social cues, empathy and emotions



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03 Sep 2020, 9:58 pm

FranzOren wrote:
For example, you only had these symptoms and it caused you distress from early to childhood.


Here are the symptoms:

Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities, as manifested
by at least two of the following, currently or by history (examples are illustrative,
not exhaustive; see text):

1. Stereotyped or repetitive motor movements, use of objects, or speech
(e.g., simple motor stereotypes, lining up toys or flipping objects, echolalia,
idiosyncratic phrases).

2. Insistence on sameness, inflexible adherence to routines, or ritualized
patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior (e.g., extreme distress at small
changes, difficulties with transitions, rigid thinking patterns, greeting rituals,
need to take same route or eat same food every day).

3. Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus
(e.g., strong attachment to or preoccupation with unusual objects,
excessively circumscribed or perseverative interests).

4. Hyper- or hyporeactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory
aspects of the environment (e.g. apparent indifference to pain/temperature,
adverse response to specific sounds or textures, excessive smelling or
touching of objects, visual fascination with lights or movement).

You wouldn't eb diagnoised cause you don't fit the criteria but its' likely fitting those criteria would in some way affect your social skills so they aren't neurotypical. So I don't thinkn that's really possible.
But let's just pretend ti wasn't it woudln't be possible according the criteria and likely would be diagnosed with sometihing else likely other developmental disorder or possibly a misdiagnosis let' not pretend like tat doesnt' happen. The system is by no means perfect but I doubt perfectly neurotypical socialskills with all of those things present. You said neurotypcal. It's possible that overtime the autistic in question learns to mask to the point of appearing to have neurotypical social skills. But if they leaned to have those social skills it more liekly poinnt to a developmental delay that's not autism. But one where there social development was delayed then sped up till then. What you are describing isn't autism. [/color]


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03 Sep 2020, 10:01 pm

FranzOren wrote:
I was asking if you could have developed social skills in time, but had restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior that caused you great distress from early childhood.


I do I think if you had only symptoms of restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior that caused you great distress from early childhood, you have social deficit, but you can absolutely understand and read social cues, empathy and emotions

The diagnosistic criteria is supposed to be diagnosed based on the childhood theefore said social skills later developed would not count. But to have neurotypical social skills and to be autistic points to something else that isn't autism. Atleast imo. I think autistic people's social skills can improve over time. But tey never will truely be neurotypical socials skills. Because neurotypicals for the most part do it instinctively. Autistic people always have to do it actively. if that makes any sense.


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FranzOren
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03 Sep 2020, 10:07 pm

I am sorry for arguing with you, I might be wrong about this.

It's just females with ASD can have better social skills and they can mask their symptoms very well then males with ASD



FranzOren
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03 Sep 2020, 10:19 pm

I do understand what you mean though



FranzOren
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03 Sep 2020, 10:47 pm

Pieplup wrote:
FranzOren wrote:
For example, you only had these symptoms and it caused you distress from early to childhood.


Here are the symptoms:

Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities, as manifested
by at least two of the following, currently or by history (examples are illustrative,
not exhaustive; see text):

1. Stereotyped or repetitive motor movements, use of objects, or speech
(e.g., simple motor stereotypes, lining up toys or flipping objects, echolalia,
idiosyncratic phrases).

2. Insistence on sameness, inflexible adherence to routines, or ritualized
patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior (e.g., extreme distress at small
changes, difficulties with transitions, rigid thinking patterns, greeting rituals,
need to take same route or eat same food every day).

3. Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus
(e.g., strong attachment to or preoccupation with unusual objects,
excessively circumscribed or perseverative interests).

4. Hyper- or hyporeactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory
aspects of the environment (e.g. apparent indifference to pain/temperature,
adverse response to specific sounds or textures, excessive smelling or
touching of objects, visual fascination with lights or movement).

You wouldn't eb diagnoised cause you don't fit the criteria but its' likely fitting those criteria would in some way affect your social skills so they aren't neurotypical. So I don't thinkn that's really possible.
But let's just pretend ti wasn't it woudln't be possible according the criteria and likely would be diagnosed with sometihing else likely other developmental disorder or possibly a misdiagnosis let' not pretend like tat doesnt' happen. The system is by no means perfect but I doubt perfectly neurotypical socialskills with all of those things present. You said neurotypcal. It's possible that overtime the autistic in question learns to mask to the point of appearing to have neurotypical social skills. But if they leaned to have those social skills it more liekly poinnt to a developmental delay that's not autism. But one where there social development was delayed then sped up till then. What you are describing isn't autism. [/color]







Autism is a form of developmental delay.


I am a little bit confused.



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04 Sep 2020, 12:25 am

FranzOren wrote:
Pieplup wrote:
FranzOren wrote:
For example, you only had these symptoms and it caused you distress from early to childhood.


Here are the symptoms:

Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities, as manifested
by at least two of the following, currently or by history (examples are illustrative,
not exhaustive; see text):

1. Stereotyped or repetitive motor movements, use of objects, or speech
(e.g., simple motor stereotypes, lining up toys or flipping objects, echolalia,
idiosyncratic phrases).

2. Insistence on sameness, inflexible adherence to routines, or ritualized
patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior (e.g., extreme distress at small
changes, difficulties with transitions, rigid thinking patterns, greeting rituals,
need to take same route or eat same food every day).

3. Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus
(e.g., strong attachment to or preoccupation with unusual objects,
excessively circumscribed or perseverative interests).

4. Hyper- or hyporeactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory
aspects of the environment (e.g. apparent indifference to pain/temperature,
adverse response to specific sounds or textures, excessive smelling or
touching of objects, visual fascination with lights or movement).

You wouldn't eb diagnoised cause you don't fit the criteria but its' likely fitting those criteria would in some way affect your social skills so they aren't neurotypical. So I don't thinkn that's really possible.
But let's just pretend ti wasn't it woudln't be possible according the criteria and likely would be diagnosed with sometihing else likely other developmental disorder or possibly a misdiagnosis let' not pretend like tat doesnt' happen. The system is by no means perfect but I doubt perfectly neurotypical socialskills with all of those things present. You said neurotypcal. It's possible that overtime the autistic in question learns to mask to the point of appearing to have neurotypical social skills. But if they leaned to have those social skills it more liekly poinnt to a developmental delay that's not autism. But one where there social development was delayed then sped up till then. What you are describing isn't autism. [/color]







Autism is a form of developmental delay.


I am a little bit confused.

What I mean is more of a developmental jet lag of sorts. Like you don't start developing said skills tilll ac ertain age but after that it's mostly normal.


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FranzOren
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04 Sep 2020, 12:55 am

It means that if you had only symptoms of restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior that caused you great distress from early childhood, you are considered to have history of developmental delay of some sort, but it might not be ASD, because it does not really effect communication