Finding and Keeping jobs - Tips and Advice

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Scoots5012
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13 Oct 2005, 5:14 pm

This thread is for all to post about getting and keeping a job.

I request that only Tips and advice be posted here.

I'm doing this becasue I got this email today. While the theroy it puts forward makes sense, on my own I would have never thought of this. So lets help out those who are down on their luck with work.

Quote:
RTF MAJORS/MINORS - THIS IS WORTH SAVING FOR FUTURE JOB SEARCHES

Thank you Kevin for this helpful information. I'm placing this on the bulletin board.
Rosemaree

Survey Methodology
The CareerBuilder.com survey, "How to Get in the Front Door," was conducted from May 17 to May 27, 2005. Methodology used to collect survey responses totaling more than 650 hiring managers for this study involved selecting a random sample of comScore Networks panel members. These Web Panel members were approached via an e-mail invitation, which asked them to participate in a short online survey. The results of this survey are statistically accurate to within +/- 3.84 percentage points (19 times out of 20).


No Thank-You Could Mean No Job, By Rosemary Haefner

It's one of the simplest things you can do. Your mother told you to always say it. By expressing it -- or not -- you can change a person's mood and perception of you in an instant. Who knew two words could be so powerful?

Writing a thank-you letter after an interview doesn't just showcase a candidate's manners - it can also make or break their chances of landing a job. Nearly 15 percent of hiring managers say they would not hire someone who failed to send a thank-you letter after the interview. Thirty-two percent say they would still consider the candidate, but would think less of him or her, according to CareerBuilder.com's recent "How to Get in the Front Door" survey.

Although most hiring managers expect to receive a thank-you note, format preferences differ. One-in-four hiring managers prefer to receive a thank-you note in e-mail form only; 19 percent want the e-mail followed up with a hard copy; 21 percent want a typed hard copy only and 23 percent prefer just a handwritten note.

No matter which format you choose, it's crucial to act quickly when sending a thank-you letter to your interviewer. Twenty-six percent of hiring managers expect to have the letter in-hand two days after the interview, and 36 percent expect to have it within three to five days. Sending the letter quickly reinforces your enthusiasm for the job, and helps keep you top-of-mind for the interviewer.

Here are some tips to make the most of your thank-you letter:

Stick to three paragraphs.
In the first paragraph, thank the interviewer for the opportunity. Use the second to sell yourself by reminding the hiring manager of your qualifications. In the third paragraph, reiterate your interest in the position.

Fill in the blanks.
Thank-you notes are a great way to add in key information you forgot in the interview, clarify any points or try to ease any reservations the interviewer might have expressed.

Proofread carefully.
Double-check to be sure your note is free from typos and grammatical errors. Don't rely solely on your spell-checker.

Be specific.
Don't send out a generic correspondence. Instead, tailor your note to the specific job and the relationship you have established with the hiring manager.

Rosemary Haefner is CareerBuilder.com¢s Vice President of Human Resources and Senior Career Adviser. She is an expert in recruitment trends and tactics, job seeker behavior, workplace issues, employee attitudes and HR initiatives.

Kevin Backstrom
Department of Communication
University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh
Arts and Communication Building S138
800 Algoma Boulevard
Oshkosh, WI 54902


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julieme
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14 Oct 2005, 7:47 am

I am currently involved in interviewing and hiring 20 co-op students for my company. When the process is over I'll publish a report on this stuff.

So far though the thankyou note stuff seems to be bogus. Student t test reveils no correlation between thankyou notes and getting invited for a second interview.

So far of import are:

Good GPA (>3.2 for my company)
Enthusiastic - really want the job
Research - have investigated what the job involves and understand it.
Willing to share recognition and credit with team mates
Personality fit (introvert/extrovert orientation) some groups prefer quiet people ( sw design, programming) others ebulent folks (Validation, hardware design). The personality so far affects which opening someone gets assigned to not if they are hired.

More later



larsenjw92286
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14 Oct 2005, 5:19 pm

That is a very good idea, Scott! I think some people like us need some tips for advice and working!


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Coctyle
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05 Nov 2005, 2:50 pm

I am more interested in finding a job that fits my personality. Despite having AS (self-diagnosed) I usualy do great at interviews. I'm not sure why, I think it can be so stressful that it is not stressful anymore, if that makes any sense. Usually interviews are easier than I think they will be before I go in. I don't have too much trouble talking about myself, and a lifetime of practice has made me a good (maybe cumpulsive) lier when necesary. I don't really lie, but I don't mention that I loath social interaction or anything like that. I also pretend to be ambitious and concerned about the stuff that people are supposed to be concernced about. I used to be in theatre in HS, so I kind of just pretend to be a fictional character that is like me, except normal.

So, in terms of finding a job that fits my personality, does anyone have any tips? When I was in college, I probably should have seen a career counseler, but I have always have had a tendency to not go to anyone for help. I don't know if there are career counselers for people who already are out of school and have a career, but want to find a new one.



JWPhotoGraphics
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07 Nov 2005, 3:03 pm

I'm interested in what can work. I usually send a thank you note, and I interview quite well. I always come in second place (it might as well be last place). The main affectation of my AS is my voice, and I feel I'm unable to win that "battle of the first impressions."



06xrs
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10 Nov 2005, 9:08 am

I know that I tend to talk to much and therefore say things that kill the interview. Ultimately, the employer is going to hire whoever he likes best whether they can do the job or not. I can usually act NT long enough to make a good first impression (my resume helps), but the longer I talk the more likely I am to say something to offend them. So I just try to answer the questions as briefly as possible with whatever answer they want to hear. If I try to say as little as possible, I hit it about right. Always remember, no matter what they say they DO NOT WANT YOUR OPINION ON ANYTHING UNLESS ITS THE SAME AS THEIRS.



Pete1051
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13 Nov 2005, 2:46 pm

What about GETTING the interview?

My biggest obstacle is actually getting someone to actually talk to me. I've sent out coutless resumes and I don't get any thing back. I try to call these people and find out what's up. It's not like I'm just sitting there i persue it. But position are always filled as soon as I apply, or the don't actually have anything at the moment, they're just taking resumes for some mystery time in the future when the might hire someone. That person most likely will be a friend of family member of someone already working there. Any job I've gotten was like that. I don't think people actually get jobs cold, off the street.

I don't know anyone who knows anyone who might be hiring someone like me. My social network sucks.

But at this point I don't want to work for someone else anymore. I want to start my own thing. I've got 2 things kinda started. But starting a business is confusing and overwhelming. But I think if I wholheartedly believe in a product I can sell it. And I believe in my own stuff, I take awesome photos, and I have some pretty good ideas for software in my head.

But logic dictates that I may reach points at which I must survive and take a "9-5" to make ends meet. I think part of my problem is that I really dont give a hoot about my boss or whatever he's so stressed about, that's his problem. If he can't give me just compensation for relieving some of the stress off his back, then he's on his own.
Having been laid off 4 times in a row, I've become kinda jaded against employers, I got the message that I, as an employee was completely expendable, and to be discarded when no longer cost effective according to the accounting people. Some of those I understand, they were small businesses, and It can be tough to keep going. I see it as no personal fault but the nature of employment in general. It is not a stable thing. And keeping a regular 9-5 job is as much work as running your own business, except somebody else reaps the profits.

But getting investment for a business is like a hardcore job interview TIMES 1000!! it's all the same weither it's a boss or a customer handing you the check.

I reference to the advice above:
Even as a business, I meet with a potential client for a web site or something. It is ESSENTIAL, that I thank them for their time and consideration. If you want some money out of someone, you gotta brownnose a little.



Pete



06xrs
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16 Nov 2005, 11:42 am

I've gotten jobs through social contacts, newspaper ads, and shotgunning resumes. Ultimately, getting a job is selling yourself, and the same rules apply. My brother runs a fairly successful software consulting business. He once told me you could figure on about a 1% response rate from anysort of marketing. Its all sheer numbers. Send out enough resumes and SOMEBODY will usually bite.

Lets face it. Companies do stupid things, including laying off their best emplyees just because they won't work 24/7 for free. So they have to keep hiring new people to replace the ones they fired. Just remember that when you finally do land that next job, its only temporary. Never stop looking for a better deal.



nerderer
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19 Nov 2005, 12:34 pm

julieme ihope your company tanks and you lose your shirt...one should have no preconcieved criteria imo.



synx13
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20 Nov 2005, 5:51 pm

How do people find good jobs though? It's no good to send your resume to a job who would mistreat you if hired, and I can't find any that don't!

How do you keep a job, once you have it?



julieme
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21 Nov 2005, 11:45 pm

Nerderer,

Quote:
julieme ihope your company tanks and you lose your shirt...one should have no preconcieved criteria imo



I am reporting STATISTICS. Student's T-test is a statistical method to find relationships. There are clearly correlations between certain issues. I did this study because there are no scientifically based studies that I could find and I had access to data that could be analyzed. FYI in keeping with ethical considerations all data was deidentified before analysis.


Is there something I should explain differently? Maybe give p values or secondary effect coefficents?



nerderer
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23 Nov 2005, 2:12 pm

you have to be good looking and a jerk if your both all the better and nobody likes a know it all.



SB2
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29 Dec 2005, 4:29 pm

One thing

America needs to be aware that the social interaction skills of those with aspergers, and some of the other traits associated with the disorder makes it a disability. Handicapping those who have it an a multitude of ways.


second thing.

Once it is established as a disability, people with aspergers would have a foot in the door for any job they are qualified for. Thanks to The American Disabilities Act, it could be viewed as discriminiation if you are not hired simply because you are a poor interviewee.

third thing


Synx 13 wrote



Quote:
How do people find good jobs though? It's no good to send your resume to a job who would mistreat you if hired, and I can't find any that don't!

How do you keep a job, once you have it?


You keep your job because of your disability. And if they mistreat you at work that would consitute the creation of a hostile work environment which is generally punished by levying hefty fines against the company in question and retention of your job. Which generally translates into the fast track up the ladder so they can hide you from the narrowminded customer and other work associates.


Simply, we must form a pact, and lobby and encourage studies into the de hibilitating factors of aspergers in society. Armed with that we need to have the DSM list aspergers as a neuro disability. Then lobby congress for recognition.



Side note:
If one with aspergers can find their niche i dont view it as a disability at all. I view it more as an advantage. Unfortunately a personal niche is hard to market. We need to stand up and be counted, NOW.
We need legislative recourse, NOW.


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Lonermutant
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07 Jan 2006, 5:37 pm

I've never heard about people who send a Thank-you-letter after a job interview, at least here in Norway.



numark
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21 Jan 2006, 9:10 am

:? thank you notes? do people really use these? in all my experience of researching into 'access to employment' in the Uk i have not once come accross one, perhaps they are reserved for particular types of work/employment?