Do extremely social extroverted people make you sick?

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steppinthrax
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03 Nov 2013, 1:28 am

I work around one of these, people, seems very annoying to me. Very extroverted, very social cracks jokes etc.....



redrobin62
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03 Nov 2013, 1:30 am

Yeah. I'm the quiet type, so loquacious, outgoing, mile a minute talkers aggravate me.



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03 Nov 2013, 1:54 am

They don't make me sick, although they can be very annoying, but in my experience all these types have severe psychosocial problems for which they are overcompensating.

I don't mean natural extroverts -- that's something quite different, and more tolerable.



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03 Nov 2013, 3:14 am

Very Very annoying at first and being on constant hyper alert would make me psychically and mentally sick, that is if I don't get fired first because I was to distracted to do my work.


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lease29
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03 Nov 2013, 3:31 am

I don't get how a lot of socially extroverted can talk all the time and have so much to say. It can get too much for me especially at work with some of the girls I work with joking around and talk a lot they have so much energy.
I will never be one of these people gets annoying at times. That's why I need a lot of alone time.



TheOneWhoKnocks
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03 Nov 2013, 4:23 am

lease29 wrote:
I don't get how a lot of socially extroverted can talk all the time and have so much to say. It can get too much for me especially at work with some of the girls I work with joking around and talk a lot they have so much energy.
I will never be one of these people gets annoying at times. That's why I need a lot of alone time.


RIGHT?? How do people go through so many different topics and never run out of things to talk about? It makes me so jealous and so what do I do? I sit and think about it alone.



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03 Nov 2013, 4:35 am

TheOneWhoKnocks wrote:
lease29 wrote:
I don't get how a lot of socially extroverted can talk all the time and have so much to say. It can get too much for me especially at work with some of the girls I work with joking around and talk a lot they have so much energy.
I will never be one of these people gets annoying at times. That's why I need a lot of alone time.


RIGHT?? How do people go through so many different topics and never run out of things to talk about? It makes me so jealous and so what do I do? I sit and think about it alone.

Yes, I do so, too. But I am not always just jealous but sometimes also think: "Why have people to talk all the time? Why can´t they stand silence?" For me it is no problem to be with a person without talking to her/him but at work I always have to talk to a special person who never can be quiet. After meeting her I always feel tired because it is very difficult for me to talk the whole time, especially about things that aren´t interesting for me. For example she loves small talk about the weather and I never know what to say, so it´s just "yes" or "no". I know this might be kind of unfriendly but I don´t know what I could say.


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TheOneWhoKnocks
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03 Nov 2013, 4:55 am

Oh yeah, don't get me wrong, if people blab and blab and blab I want to just grab them and put my hand over their mouth saying "shhh, be quiet". I go through the same thing if I don't how to answer something, I will resort to "yes" or "no" answers. Our brains are hardwired this way because we don't exactly think as they do, we aren't quick to respond and we sometimes don't even know what to say!



Codyrules37
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03 Nov 2013, 8:22 am

no not at all.

why dont you try to be social to people instead of sitting your ass on your computer all day? Don't lay on the outskirts of social circles, or avoid them completely. Theres nothing with being social with other people and you will find that if you treat me people as inferior to yourself, then you will have no friends. You don't want this.



steppinthrax
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03 Nov 2013, 8:47 am

I have read that there are neurological differences between extroverts and introverts. I've always been an introvert. I've read read that introverts have what's known as "low cortical arousal", meaning they don't need much stimulation to get the "excited". Whereas extroverts need constant stimulation and they do this via a strong tie with the outside word, where they talk and talk and talk and talk. Introverts tend to daydream and keep to themselves. They get simple but enough energy to stimulation themselves with solitary activities.

What's strange is extroversion is prized highly within the United States, whereas in other countries (particularly east Asian) introversion is more polite and socially acceptable.

This may sound bad, but I believe extroverted persons are "handicap" in the sense that they need some external "medicine". But people don't see it like that....



droppy
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03 Nov 2013, 9:08 am

Not really.
Andrew is an extravert and at times he can be extremely extroverted and hanging out with him it's fun. But when his dysthymia becomes evident he doesn't talk unless you speak first and becomes sorta intravert-like, even though he is an extravert. He hides his depression under some fake happiness. I don't think he should do that. It's bad for his health.



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03 Nov 2013, 9:26 am

steppinthrax wrote:
I have read that there are neurological differences between extroverts and introverts. I've always been an introvert. I've read read that introverts have what's known as "low cortical arousal", meaning they don't need much stimulation to get the "excited". Whereas extroverts need constant stimulation and they do this via a strong tie with the outside word, where they talk and talk and talk and talk. Introverts tend to daydream and keep to themselves. They get simple but enough energy to stimulation themselves with solitary activities.


This describes both myself and my mother to a "T".

She's passed on now, but when she was alive, when we talked about life and things, we both remarked how other people seem to think they only had an exciting time or day or week or occasion if a lot of external stuff happened, a lot of talking and socializing happened. Where, by contrast, both my mum and I would feel like "a lot happened" to interest us even when we'd just stayed home pottering about, deep in our own respective thoughts and activities, or just reading books. It was something I felt I had massively in common with mum and we always remarked at how rich our respective inner lives felt to us, and at how a lot of other people seemed to need "outer" stuff to feel that their day -- or even their inner world -- was interesting or stimulating. I'm not saying we had these incredible minds full of amazing thoughts -- I'm just saying we each felt like our own "stuff inside our heads" was plenty of fun for us.

Quote:
What's strange is extroversion is prized highly within the United States, whereas in other countries (particularly east Asian) introversion is more polite and socially acceptable.

This may sound bad, but I believe extroverted persons are "handicap" in the sense that they need some external "medicine". But people don't see it like that....


I also have always had this slight feeling that it's the social whirlwind extroverts who seem to have something lacking in themselves if they can't find excitement, stimulation and interest just from things that go on inside one's mind, but instead feel compelled to have more of an outward life than an inner richness. I don't mean that to sound as bashing as it does, and I'm not knocking highly social people for enjoying their life that way -- it's just that it always made me wonder if that was necessarily a good thing to be so dependent on external meeting of needs.


.



StuckWithin
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03 Nov 2013, 9:47 am

Yes.

The reason is that such people often get to set the agenda in the office, and then you are measured against them. When you prefer solitude and deep focusing on your work, you begin to be seen as the freak, not them.

Some people like the type you described seem to go a long way in getting social power in a workplace, even if those who interact with them don't truly like them very much. It's really weird.


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StuckWithin
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03 Nov 2013, 9:52 am

steppinthrax wrote:
What's strange is extroversion is prized highly within the United States, whereas in other countries (particularly east Asian) introversion is more polite and socially acceptable.

This may sound bad, but I believe extroverted persons are "handicap" in the sense that they need some external "medicine". But people don't see it like that....

That changed when America's population shifted from primarily rural to urban. Then the culture of the salesman took over, and that is why extraoversion (even if fake) is so prized.

I wish we had the old American values back. People might be encouraged to value genuine things again.


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03 Nov 2013, 10:01 am

Any of you ever feel like punching that used car salesman when he come swooping down on you like a Vulture and starts talking over your head and interrupting you so you can't say a thing.